Chocolate Mid-Century Style Fabric

Now it’s a fact that not all mid-century furnishing fabrics were dull and coloured dark green as this lively design tries to show.

Using chocolate as a base – a genuine mid-century British Standard colour – this pattern is intended to look noticeable and to draw the eye to the furniture on which it is used. Although I do like small, fast repeats and less contrast fabrics, every now and again I also like to splash out and use something eye-catching and different.

This is the sort of fabric that might have been available mid-century for use on a feature piece of furniture and it is shown here on a mid-century style sofa and chair.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A Mid-Century Lounge Style Wallpaper

Wallpaper is not so popular today but mid-century in the United Kingdom wallpaper was on almost all walls that were not tiled.

The 1950s and 1960s saw a wealth of innovation in design that was to set the scene for the decades to follow. This wallpaper design uses a motif that would perhaps have found favour at that time with a colour scheme popular mid-century.

The set is my usual mid-century living room set and I was pleased that the colours went so well with the furnishings to create a late mid-century look. The pattern was made in Xara Designer which makes it very easy to produce small motifs while the room and the image were made using Cinema 4D.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

More Tiles For A Kitchen Wall

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Now that I have my kitchen set complete and looking sort of reasonably good, I have to admit it, I am hooked on making tiles.

Once again these tiles have their roots in the mid-century in the UK for both the colour and for the simple design. What I particularly like is the way that tiles look when repeated because of the join between them and the fact that it is obvious that they are individual squares. This somehow seems to give the wall a fragmented yet whole look which would be difficult to achieve with a wallcovering made to resemble tiles.

When I created my mid-century kitchen I created the tiling in either single tile or the popular one pattern and then one plain tile which was popular in the 1960s. Although not the most inventive design I have ever created I am, however, pleased with the result. Because of the way that the tiles are created I am not able to bring you a swatch but you can see a larger version of the image above on our Flickr page which is here.

The design was created with Xara Designer while the image was made using my ever present Cinema 4D.

Tiles For A Kitchen Wall

I have created this mid-century inspired tile designed for a kitchen or, of course, any other room in the house that has a blue decor.

Although the design uses mid-century ideas and very mid-century colours it would look just as good in a modern room where it provides an effective tile pattern. One reason for this is that the pattern is a small motif and a fast repeat which, I think, makes it look so good.

This design was created with Xara Designer while the set is a detail of my mid-century kitchen which was created in Cinema 4D and which program was used to produce the image.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

Rich Premium Mid-Century Style Fabric

If some time since I produced a design for fabric and so I thought now would be a good opportunity to show my mid-century inspired pattern.

This design uses a motif which I think would have been very much at home in the mid-century United Kingdom. The colours are taken from colours used at the time and the motif is a simple one which is designed to try to look good no matter where it is used.

I have given up trying to make images using Daz and so I am showing the design used as material for the curtains in my old set, West Avenue in Cinema 4D. I was surprised, when I did this, what a good texture the design created for the curtains. Note that, rather than use artificial light – which is the way that the room would have been lit since this is obviously evening – I have kept the lighting simple to show the colour of the fabric.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

Mid-Century Tiles For A Kitchen Wall

Following on from the post the other day showing some mid-century tiles, I have created a further tile which could be for the kitchen or for any other room in the house.

The design uses mid-century ideas and very mid-century colours to produce an understated yet effective tile pattern which I have shown on the kitchen wall although it could be used as a tile on any other walls. In the UK the years of the 1950s and 60s saw an upsurge in decorating techniques and tiles began to be used as much as they had been in the previous century.

Once again the design was created with Xara Designer while the set is my mid-century kitchen wall set created in Cinema 4D.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A 1950s Style Lounge Wallpaper

United Kingdom wallpaper in the 1950s saw a wealth of new design and innovation which set the scene – and the colours – for the way designs would develop in the decades ahead.

One particular trend (yes, I know I have said this before) was the advent of the small motif and quick repeat which produced, in my opinion, some of the nicest wallpaper designs of the whole mid-century. This design, I hope, mimics those patterns. It is a style which has more or less disappeared and is ready now for a revival.

The motifs are similar to the mid-century motifs used while the colours are genuine mid-century colours so could well have been used for this type of design. The set is my mid-century living room set made in Cinema 4D and I think the colours go well with the furnishings and produce a very mid-century look to the room. For the record the design was made in Xara Designer which makes it easy to produce small motifs – fast repeat patterns.

You can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.