Yellow Train Seats

aff179_1000I do like creating fabric patterns for transportation, particularly when those patterns can be lively, interesting and can make a real difference to the look of the space.

This design uses mid-century colours and to an extent, mid-century motifs to produce a pattern intended to look bright and cheerful and to make the passengers journey all the more enjoyable.

The colours used are canary yellow for the base and then vanilla, mellow buff and porcelain blue with a stroke of magnolia.

If you wish then you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Flowery Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowery Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowery Train Seats Swatch

These are mid-century flower-power train seats designed for suburban short-haul trains which have a quickly changing passenger population.

This pattern is inspired by the 1960’s flower power generation and is intended not to be the sort of restful pattern you might get on an intercity express where passengers were there for the duration. It is intended to be stimulating, eye-catching and to attract the passenger who is travelling a few stops and then getting off. The design is vibrant and alive, designed to keep the sitters awake and alert, waiting for their stop.

The colours are all (I think) from the British Standard 5252 but they are too numerous to list which means that this design probably could not have been printed mid-century!

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Bird Seat Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bird Seat Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bird Seat Fabric Swatch

This is a pattern intended for bus, train or coach seats where the journey is perhaps a longer one or for whatever reason high contrast patterns are not required.

The motif has mid-century roots and colours although the actual design is very modern. The idea is that the pattern is much more closely coupled to the background and so the overall effect is more restful and so conducive to longer journeys.

This fabric would also be useful in situations where a high contrast or highly coloured finish is not desired or where such a finish is inappropriate.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Intriguing Train Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Intriguing Train Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Intriguing Train Seat Pattern Swatch

This is another transportation pattern which was, in fact, designed from the ground up as a pattern for train seats, either as doubles or multiple.

I did try this pattern as seating for a bus and in various background colours but the result you see was the best looking pattern and the best looking application.

The pattern is intended to be used at a relatively small-scale and to give seats an individual look without making them look eye-catching or gaudy. The design was intended for relatively long travel rather than short-term bus routes.

The only problem with patterns of this nature is cleanliness and therefore a careful choice of material would have to be made. That said, I believe that this pattern is worth consideration since, as you can see above, the effect is such a pleasant one. I have included on my Flickr page a detail image which shows a close-up of the pattern used on the train seats.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Green Dotted Seats

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Green Dotted Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Green Dotted Seats Swatch

This is a transportation design which was intended for any type of seat, either multi-seating or individual/double seats, the sort of seating you find in a typical bus, coach or train.

The design has mid-century roots being reminiscent of many of the patterns produced in the early 1950s although the colours and the way that the pattern is executed brings the design very much up-to-date.

I thought that the pattern looks best on a row of seats, and I have therefore used my bus set although this pattern, perhaps at a slightly smaller scale, would look good for the double seats on a bus or the train seating that I also use. To make this point I have included on my Flickr page an image created with this pattern using the train set.

The way that the pattern is put together is designed to separate the seats rather than show them as one complete unit and, hopefully, the design takes the passenger’s eye up and down the seats rather than across. Normally this makes the seats best for single or double although I quite like them as a row.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Following on from yesterday’s post about bus seats, we have a pattern which has some similarities and which is designed for similar modes of transport. In this particular case, however, it is shown as the pattern on the seats in a train.

Once again the pattern is shown at a fairly small-scale although in this particular case it does not have a strong horizontal element, the pattern being more or less equally divided. This, I think, lends itself well to double seating and I rather like the look of it in seats which face.

Once again the pattern is a colourful one with small shapes designed to enliven and amuse the traveller and so this is, of course, intended primarily for use where the journey time will be relatively short. In my opinion, longer journeys of an hour or greater should really use seats which are more relaxing. I will show suitable ‘long-range’ patterns at a later date.

The train was modelled in Cinema 4D with all of the modelling produced by me and I have, of course, produced all of the textures used.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.