Aff518 As Wallpaper

Pattern aff518 you have already seen but this is the pattern as it might look if it were created as wallpaper for use in a modern room although, it has to be said, a modern room that looks back to the mid-century era.

I am not in favour, as you will probably know, of solid coloured walls without any decoration and yet, however, they are still fashionable for the time being. In order to create a room which bows to modern fashion, I have used the wallpaper on three of the walls (you are unable to see the third) and left the window wall painted white. I have also used white paint on the skirting board and other woodwork.

The effect I’m trying to create is one of brightness and light but where the interior has a decorated look rather than architectural and the walls, for the most part, are not boring solid colours.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff518 Pattern

Although it seems not to be the case, people and ideas really don’t change from one decade to another and what was good decoration mid-century would still be seen by people as good decoration today. The only thing that does change is fashion and fashions, as we all know, tend to come and go and then come around again.

This simple, mid-century design was intended right from the first stroke to be an easy but effective wallpaper pattern for a plain wall in an everyday modern house. But it was also intended as a design which incorporates mid-century type motifs and which uses mid-century colours.

The result is something which will not set the world alight but which will create on the wall a bright but plain effect but with the motifs there to relieve the boredom of a solid coloured wall. It will also make the space and the dimensions of the room either seen bigger or at least play to their full extent. Obviously, this design begs to be put on a wall and hopefully I will have a little time later today in order to do just that.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff517 Wallpaper

A busy, busy Belle Epoque 2 pattern as wallpaper – sounds good but does it work? Above is my rather upmarket English country house set which has been given this Belle Epoque 2 design as a wallcovering. Although it is not obvious from the set, this design would probably cover all the walls.

Although seemingly a feature wallpaper and, certainly, in a modern room such as a high-class apartment, it would be just confined to one small wall, in a setting such as this I feel that it is permissible to use it as a wallcovering on all of the walls.

The other advantage is that the colours are mid-century and they also have that strong mid-century look which I hope gives the room that classic English elegant aspect. Would I have it in my room? Yes, certainly, if I had a room like this I would.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff517 Pattern

I have not given up on Belle Epoque 2 patterns and this one, although having a somewhat newer origin, fits my criteria for Belle Epoque 2 as well as producing what could well be one of my nicest wallpaper designs.

The origin of this design lies back in the 1970s when the excesses of the previous decade were being curtailed and suddenly large circular patterns began to appear on walls. So far as I know, there was no one single reason for there introduction but I do remember that suddenly they seem to be everywhere.

The colours are mid-century colours taken from my extended palette and I have taken one liberty which you would not have found extensively in the 1970s. Instead of a light background I have used mid-century chocolate which gives the design is slightly more modern look. Wallpapers like this would have been available mid-century although they were not that common because the concept of feature walls was still being developed.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff513 Pattern And Match

There are two patterns today to see, I began creating this design to be used as curtains but decided that it would be useful to have at hand a similar and matching colour for cushions or other soft furnishings. The top swatch above represents the curtains while the other would be for the cushions.

These patterns are designed for a modern room although they take their inspiration, as does almost all of my work, from mid-century designs and patterns produced in the United Kingdom in the 1950s and 60s. The motif is simple although this is not a Belle Epoque 2 design since the pattern does not have a fast repeat and the colouring is far too bland. The purpose of the design is to produce a fabric which is predominantly of one colour but with a simple, sparse decoration to add interest.

The design for the cushion is, once again, a simple one but one which adds interest and produces a pattern which, while not prominent, will catch the eye of a visitor and enhance the look of the surrounding furniture.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link at Amazon UK for Color And Pattern by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still use) for creating patterns.

Aff512 Wallpaper

My first thought was that I should use this as soft furnishing and I therefore tried it as a curtain material where it was moderately successful. However, trying it as wallpaper produced a far better effect as you can see above.

As I have already said, abstract designs are a departure for me and, having given the matter some thought, I am not sure if it is a path that I want to actively pursue. I feel much more at home with geometric style patterns, the sort of patterns that you are accustomed to seeing from me.

However, this pattern does give the room, it is an upmarket apartment, a different and quite exciting look which I was very pleased to see once the image had been produced by my software.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff512 Pattern

Before you rush to tell me, this not a Belle Epoque 2 pattern, it is a pure abstract design and follows some research I did into abstract patterns used mid-century on soft furnishings and wall coverings in the United Kingdom.

The design of abstract patterns is very different and a very new departure for me since I normally begin my patterns with some form of geometric design. Initially I was not sure how good this pattern would look in relation to the work that I already do but I decided to press ahead and see the finished product.

Until you use a pattern it is difficult to say whether it is a successful design or not and, in any event, the success of a design is determined by other people and so I will try this as either soft furnishing or a wallcovering and we will see the result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.