Orange Texture Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Orange Texture Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Orange Texture Wallpaper

This was another experiment to produce a wallpaper which resembled a texture and was designed for modern rooms although the design still retains a hint of mid-century.

The design itself is simple enough but the colouring was very carefully tweaked using Alien Skin to produce the result which you see in the image above. The wall at this scale is beginning to resemble a texture and, in fact, would look better perhaps at a slightly smaller scale although in so doing I ran into difficulties producing the image with moire patterns.

However, the result is a wallcovering which is decidedly different and which would catch a visitor’s eye but still produce a warm and liveable pattern.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

The ‘C’ Wall

01-sky_1000

The ‘C’ Wall

Mid-century inspired pattern

The ‘C’ Wall

I am still working on and refining my technique for creating walls that reflect my background in using patterns to make three-dimensional textures.

This particular design is very much mid-century inspired following the type of designs that were made in the early 1950s in the UK. The motif itself is created from a rectangle although the effect from a distance is to make it look like a capital letter C. It is for this reason that the article is so named.

The motif, if you look carefully, is a lot more complex than a simple letter and uses various colours sourced from mid-century to produce the effect. The scale used is a small one which allows you to see the pattern from a distance although for the visitor the effect on the wall should be a total one of a texture rather than an individual pattern. Using such a simple device as this I saw the wallpaper being used in a modern room although it is shown here in my mid-century themed living area.

The effect of the pattern is, I hope, to take the eye of the visitor across the room thus showing its size and scale. I have also included on my Flickr page (I’m afraid you will have to go there to see it) a close-up of the image above which shows the pattern in more detail.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Scaled Clouds

Mid-century inspired pattern

Scaled Clouds

Mid-century inspired pattern

Scaled Clouds Swatch

This is yet another experiment in using small scale patterns to produce both a pattern and, when seen from a distance by a visitor, a texture.

The pattern itself is a complex pattern, originally called clouds, which is used at a very small scale in order to produce on the wall the effect of a texture. This is an effect I have used before although in this case I have made the scale a little looser. The image above is the one that you would see if you were seated in a chair in the room.

To help make this clear I have included on my Flickr page an image which shows the same room as it would look if you stood about 6 foot (2 m) from the wall. From here it is obvious that the pattern is a pattern although to the visitor entering the room the effect is that the wall appears as a texture.

The trend these days is to use more solid colours and less traditional patterns on walls but I feel that this often has the effect of making the room look cold and uninviting. However, I feel, that using a pattern like this as a texture makes the room look much warmer and gives it a more cosy feel.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Round Again

Mid-century inspired pattern

Round Again

Mid-century inspired pattern

Round Again Swatch

But this is the 1970s! Well not exactly, although that hectic and rather riotous period was the inspiration for this particular pattern although the style and colouring bears more relationship to modern design than it does to mid-century.

I set out to take the best of mid-century and convert that into a pattern which would be acceptable today – that is, of course, the whole purpose of Midcentury Styles. The result is a quite unusual look to the wall which results from the dark background colour (not really mid-century) and the different coloration of the flower’s individual petals. This unusual colour scheme catches the eye of the visitor and the quite large scale (something that is 1970s) makes the visitor notice the coloration.

This set is not designed to be a minimalist modern room, it is more the sort of room that exists in most houses in the UK and it is designed to reflect popular taste. in this room, I believe, the wallpaper works well.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Small Scale Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Small Scale Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Small Scale Fabric Swatch

Before the war, at least in the United Kingdom, patterns were invariably used at a fairly small-scale and involved often single motifs.

This trend continued after the war although it was during the late 1960s and early 1970s that designers began to produce patterns designed for a much larger scale particularly where the pattern was intended for use as wallpaper.

That trend has continued through the decades but it is a trend that can always be reversed and history tells us that the designs from our past frequently come round to beautify our homes in the future. This particular pattern is a complex one and it was designed from the outset to be used at a small scale.

Wallpaper, at this scale, would never be acceptable and so the design was translated to the way that it would look as fabric and I have used it on the curtains and cushions in one of my standard sets. The effect is quite striking and produces a pattern which emboldens the visitor to look more carefully to see how the effect is produced. I really was quite genuinely surprised at how good the fabric looked as both curtaining and for cushions and I was pleased at the final result of this pattern.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Dot To Dot

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dot To Dot Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dot To Dot Swatch

This is a further extension of the work that I have been doing on small-scale pattern use to produce a textured feel to a wallcovering.

I have, in fact, changed the scale again to make this less of a texture and more of a definite pattern in order to provide a wall with a strong horizontal component which runs across the room taking the eye out to the window and to the view beyond. The pattern is an unusual design using mid-century colours and indistinct shapes.

I have included with my Flickr page a close-up which shows the design a little more clearly and importantly shows it the way that it would look to someone standing perhaps three or four feet from the wall.

I was pleased with the look of the wall and, although not exactly a texture, the wall does exhibit textural properties and it does have the same sort of appearance as brick or block would have which I personally find very attractive.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Brown Bedroom

Mid-century inspired pattern

Brown Bedroom

Mid-century inspired pattern

Brown Bedroom

Modern design tends to have bedrooms which are, in my opinion, a little bland and cold and not as homely as I would like. Many of them are not the sort of space in which I would like to awaken each day.

The designs of the 1950s and 60s in the UK, from which I take my inspiration, were quite the opposite, delighting in the use of patterns to breakup and beautify large areas of wall or wood. Whilst I would not want to see a return to the excesses of mid-century pattern usage (for example the late 1960s and early 1970s), I do think interior spaces could be made to look nicer without sacrificing the ideas of modern design.

The bedroom above, which is one of my standard sets, has a patterned wall but the pattern uses quite a small scale in order not to dominate. Aside from this pattern, the remaining walls and the curtain are pattern free. Using a small scale like this on the wall does not catch the eye but it does, in my view, create a much more restful and inviting look to the space.

The pattern also has a horizontal sense to it given by the yellow components and this, I hope, tends to take the eye across the room rather than up-and-down and so enhances the room’s dimensions. The main motif is relieved by the interior circles to give it a slightly intriguing and more interesting look.

Is this a room that I would be pleased to see when I woke up each day? I believe that it is.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.