Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains Swatch

This is a pattern which uses perhaps more modern ideas and motifs but with mid-century ideals and colours from the British Standard in use in the 1950s and 60s in the United Kingdom.

The design is the sort of design that might have been available in the 1950s and here I have adapted it as curtain material in a very ordinary mid-century living room. The effect is to make the curtains look clean and uncluttered and in that sense, they look modern. This could be an excellent design if used in a newly created mid-century room.

According to my notes the colour of the background is sky while the colours used in the motif are Paris green, middle brown and montella.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper Swatch

Patterns were often used at a small scale for wallpaper to give the walls a more unified look where the individual motif was less important than the total, overall look.

Mid-century designers changed many things, including many of the established rules, and wallpapers began to be seen with larger, more colourful and more prominent motifs. This made the motif, rather than the overall pattern, the most important part of the design as can be seen in many 1960s wall coverings.

But a pattern is a pattern, it is designed to be seen as a repeat motif and the repeat element never totally disappeared. In the 1970s it began, in its turn, to be more prominent along with the larger motifs.

This little bit of history leads us to today’s pattern which is a large motif but where the repeat is just as important to create the overall effect. Here I have used the pattern on one wall of a modern dining area in a large room overlooking a splendid garden. The scale is large but not massive and the repeat makes the wall look impressive while carrying the eye along the width. Only one wall would be used this way since this is too much on all the walls (although in the 1970s all the walls would have been papered).

My notes have the background as moss green and the motif as jonquil, anchusa (blue) and ribbon blue with a chocolate stroke.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Dark Red Stair Carpet

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dark Red Stair Carpet

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dark Red Stair Carpet

This is part of the 1966 West Avenue set which has been brought up to date and shows the hall and stairs as it would look if the house had just been purchased and refurbished by its new owner.

The property is a three bedroom, semi-detached house built just before the Second World War and is similar to many thousand that exist in the United Kingdom.

A first for me, this is, I think, my first carpet design and, in fact, this design was intended solely as stair carpet. So many houses that I see on the internet do not have decorative carpeted stairs which I think makes them look very ordinary, plain and non-descript. This design, which has strong mid-century roots and also mid-century colours, is intended to look good, enhance the dimensions of the stairs and prove inviting for both a visitor and the homeowner.

I have used chrome bars to run across each stair in order to hold the carpet in place, although it would be equally good with any other form of modern fastening.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Curtain Fabric Mauve

Mid-century inspired pattern

Curtain Fabric Mauve

Mid-century inspired pattern

Curtain Fabric Mauve Swatch

I decided to make a design that, whilst mid-century in inspiration and in feeling, had perhaps a more modern look.

The background colour mauve is not a mid-century colour. There are various blues but the colouring does not extend far enough and so this was an interesting project for me in which I explored some new ground.

The pattern placed on the background is much more mid-century as are the colours and, if you change the background, the resulting pattern would not look out of place in the 1960s. On my Flickr page I have included a swatch which shows the same pattern but with a plain midnight blue mid-century background rather than the mauve muted tartan. If you look at this you will see exactly what I mean.

In fact, having thought about this, I will post tomorrow the same scene but this time with the midnight blue pattern curtain so that you can decide for yourself which one you prefer.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Interesting Bedroom Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Interesting Bedroom Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Interesting Bedroom Wallpaper Swatch

This wallpaper was designed as bedroom wallpaper for a room that does not require a loud paper and which similarly does not require a quiet one.

The motif and the colours are both mid-century and the overall look of the pattern could also be considered from that period although I have tried to create a design that looks up to date in the room.

It is not a loud pattern that is intended to be used on a large-scale and provide a wide-awake, immediate challenge to the visitor and by the same token it is not intended to be a quiet, restful design intended for a very dedicated sleeping room.

These days rooms tend to double or even triple in usage and frequently a bedroom is also a study and often also a lounge and a room in which friends are entertained. To use a particularly loud or a particularly quiet pattern in a room such as this would be to make it look odd and out of place and so this pattern is neither of these. However, it is, I hope, an attractive and entertaining design which would look the part for any of the activities mentioned.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Furnishing Fabric Ai262

Furnishing Fabric

This is a very nice one-off fabric that I made with the intention of using it in this particular set.

Although contemporary in look, this design and its motifs, and to an extent the colours, date to mid-century styles and patterns produced in the 1950s and 60s.

This is my modern-day, contemporary penthouse suite and I wanted a pattern that would be noticeable and attractive to the eye without taking the design too far. This pattern, I believe, both draws the eye and creates a good-looking environment for the furniture user.

The pattern was made in only one colour although, of course, the possibility exists to use other colour schemes, although I have a feeling that they may not be as successful as this one. Making patterns for furnishing can be particularly difficult but I am pleased that this one seems, in my view at least, to have succeeded.

As above, this set is my penthouse set and the final image was created and rendered in Cinema 4D with a little extra work in Photoshop.

You can see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A useful and timeless oval coffee table

A useful and timeless oval coffee table

Some designs look timeless in the sense that they may have been made some time in the past or they may be modern, it is just difficult to tell.

Furniture like this is very useful to the 3D designer since it can fit into interiors representing many different periods of time. Whilst this design would not, I feel, fit into a pre-war interior it would look very nice as a mid-century piece or even something more modern, right up to the present day.

The basic design for this coffee table appeared, as far as I can tell, in the 1950s or 1960s because I remember seeing images of oval tables produced during this period. However, as I said above, designs like this tend to be quite timeless and tables using a similar design are still in production today.

I have to be honest and say that this table, once I saw it and did some research, has fast become one of my favourites and will be almost certainly an item that we will purchase for our own home sometime in the near future. It is excellent as pure design because the oval shape lends itself to a lot of exciting furniture placement. It is also so different to the normal rectangular table and catches the light in quite a different way. I had in mind positioning this up against a wall where the shape and quality of the wood will show up well against, as in this case, a plain wall.

This table, if it were real, would be a less than 2 foot in height and overall less than 4 foot across and around 2 foot deep which I think are nice proportions. Hopefully, in a room, this will make the coffee table look big but not enormous, at least in most UK rooms.

The model was created in Cinema 4D and textured with a wood surface that I created with Filter Forge and the final render uses a simple room set that I use to test the look of new models. I also had in mind making the C4D model available if anyone wanted to use it.

A full size image is on my Flickr page which is here.