Aff438 Wallpaper

Following on as I said from this morning’s post, this is the 1950s style design that I created earlier now transformed into a wallcovering. It is, I suppose, a feature wall although it is not a design that catches the visitor’s eye nor is it intended to be something that transforms the room.

Rather, this is a pleasant wallpaper that gives a colour and a warmth to the room and which prevents the walls from looking dull and uninteresting.

This room is the living area of a large and well-appointed apartment and the wallpaper is intended to give the room a modern, stylish yet traditional look and feel.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff422 Pattern

I usually make patterns that have a specific goal in mind, be that as a wallcovering, a textile or perhaps some other purpose. In this particular case, I intended this pattern to be a wallcovering but as soon I began the creation process, it took on a life of its own.

As you can see from the swatch above, this would not be a suitable wallcovering except for the most outrageous room in the most stylish of houses. Once I had finished, however, I began to see that this was really a textile pattern which would be suited to curtains or, perhaps, as a fashion pattern.

The design comes from mid-century roots and the colouring is also taken from my extended mid-century palette. I did some experimentation with the colour and I intend to make some variants of this pattern to use both as curtain material and also as fashion on the maniquins that I used recently for a similar purpose.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff421 Wallpaper

This is a wall covering design which was intended for a room where pink is a predominant colour. I was thinking of a bedroom or a dressing room or, perhaps, a quiet sitting room or study in a tranquil house in the country.

The motif is similar to those used mid-century although, in that case, the colouring would be predominantly, perhaps, green or brown. For this design I have created something pink which I believe looks stylish without being too obtrusive or noticeable.

After I finished the design and had produced the final images I sat and thought, as I always do, about alternative uses and I decided that, in this colour at least, wall covering was perhaps the most useful final product. If I have a little time today, I will change the colours and see if I can produce something that would work as a fashion pattern since I have a feeling that, by using different colours, I can create something that might be equally good.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff419 Wallpaper

Wallpaper patterns and designs are quite difficult to do because it is hard to see how the design will look once it is repeated so many times on a wall.

It is also hard because wallpaper needs to be relatively inconspicuous for the most part. The exception being for feature walls and even these look too busy and too complex to if they are created the same as, for example, a fabric pattern.

This design falls into the simple and inconspicuous category and is intended to be an everyday wallpaper pattern for today, although the arrangement of the motifs, and the simple motif itself, is similar to those used mid-century. Used on every wall this would not look out of place although, perhaps, it would be a good idea to have one wall as a feature wall and, taking for its main colour, one of the colours from this pattern.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff418 Upholstery

Patterns on furniture such as sofas and armchairs seems to be either extremely bold and eye-catching or else they are quite sombre and subdued.

The thinking, I have always assumed, behind this is that furniture should not be overreactive to the environment since that does make it difficult to change the colour scheme in the room. Only other hand, of course, furniture which has a more restrained pattern can often remain unnoticed amongst the other elements.

I have created this pattern in an attempt to make an upholstery fabric which is neither eye-catching, gaudy or difficult to match and yet which is not the sort of pattern which passes unnoticed. The elements that make up the pattern are, I hope, both good from a distance and also interesting from close to in order to provide interest for the visitor sitting, for example, in the chair.

The colours are from my extended, mid-century palette while the motifs owe their origin to the kind of motifs that would have been used in the 1970s.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff417 Upholstery

Making upholstery patterns for sofas and chairs is an important part of pattern making and often it is not wanted to make the patterns too intrusive or too noticeable. This design was intended as furnishing fabric to be used on a fairly small-scale so that it is pleasant but not overly apparent.

The motifs are mid-century, as is the colouring and the pattern is a simple fast repeat of two motifs which are very regular and, I hope, pleasing to the eye.

Designs like this are never going to be headline designs but they are very much the normal, average patterns that you so often find now, and did find mid-century, doing regular day-on-day service on furniture.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff415 Boats

This is a normal boat pattern of which every British decade, even the mid-century ones, have produced numerous examples possibly showing the importance of the sea to the United Kingdom.

There is nothing special about this pattern, the motifs are fairly standard and, you will expect this by now, the colouring is taken from my mid-century palette. The pattern was created primarily for fashion or soft furnishings although, to be honest, it is a design which I have not used and perhaps never will.

What is nice is the gentle flow of the boats and the restfulness of the whole image, an effect which I was not intentionally trying to create but which, nevertheless, is very welcome.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.