Dark Background Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dark Background Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Dark Background Wallpaper Swatch

Dark wallpaper is really only for feature walls or walls that require a different and contrasting look but there are occasions when you can relax this rule a little.

This design and its colouring owes a lot to mid-century and, of course, to the Arts and Crafts movement in vogue at the turn of the 20th century when many fine floral wall coverings were created.

I had been looking recently at a magazine photo of various wallpapers and I was fascinated by the idea of an archway through from one room to another. It gives a good opportunity to experiment with lighting and with the all-important shadows, as well as with wall covering design and seemed just the thing for this wallpaper.

The result is this new 3D set created in Cinema 4D which has an arch from the living area to the dining room. I applied the design to the archway and the final image, I thought, was very sophisticated and upmarket providing a pleasant and unusual look to the two rooms. I have a tendency to over-use sets but this is a set that I will use again from time to time.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1960’s Colourful Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

1960’s Colourful Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

1960’s Colourful Wallpaper Swatch

I’ve said it before; the mid-1960s was something of a riot or, to be more exact, something of a melting pot into which went all the new designs from the late 1940s and 1950s to mix with the fantastic and quite new rise in teenage artistic input. The result – alright, I call it a riot – but it might be more correct to call it pure, unadulterated, vibrant, teenage energy.

Colours became brighter, more saturated, shapes were bigger and more obvious and the ethos was excitement at the pent-up energy then being let loose.

This pattern hopes to catch some of that excitement and colour in a design that I intended for use as a wall covering. It is shown here in my mid-century room set that I often use for wallpaper. The colours are still mid-century which shows how versatile a palette it is. They are shown in my notes as canary yellow, anchusa (it’s a blue flower), magnolia,
midnight blue, bottle green and orchis (another flower).

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Flowery Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowery Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowery Train Seats Swatch

These are mid-century flower-power train seats designed for suburban short-haul trains which have a quickly changing passenger population.

This pattern is inspired by the 1960’s flower power generation and is intended not to be the sort of restful pattern you might get on an intercity express where passengers were there for the duration. It is intended to be stimulating, eye-catching and to attract the passenger who is travelling a few stops and then getting off. The design is vibrant and alive, designed to keep the sitters awake and alert, waiting for their stop.

The colours are all (I think) from the British Standard 5252 but they are too numerous to list which means that this design probably could not have been printed mid-century!

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Bedroom Or Not Bedroom

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bedroom Or Not Bedroom

This is a very simple pattern of shapes, or more accurately rectangles and chains, the sort of design that would, mid-century, have been offered as wall covering for a bedroom.

Here, however, it is brought up to date with some suitable early 1960s colours which give it a dated and rather romantic look reminiscent (I hope) of the sort of wallpaper produced during that decade but which could be used in a mid-century room today.

The colours used are quite unsaturated and the shapes are simple and direct, again the way that design was progressing at that time. It’s a fun pattern, fun to make and it would be fun to use as wallpaper or even as fabric.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Mid-Century Quads

Mid-century inspired pattern

Mid-Century Quads

The 1950s seems to have been a time for the introduction and inspirational use of simple and previously under-used elements in surface pattern construction.

For example, rectangles (are they quadrilaterals – I never know) are used here to produce a pattern with fills just of mid-century inspired solid colours. Previously, patterns tended to be fussy designs mostly centred around floral elements but the use of simpler, less stylised shapes created designs that were very different but equally beautiful.

It was 1950 so it was a quieter revolution compared to what was to follow in the next decade but it was a change in style without which the riot that was the 1960s could not have existed. I like 1950s patterns for their quieter, more gentle grace and their stylish and often exciting (and moving) use of colour and form.

I had in mind that this design would look good as fabric, especially if used for curtaining or for stand-out cushions.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Watching You Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Watching You Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Watching You Pattern Swatch

Now that I have my mannequins sorted and working well, I am enjoying creating fashion fabric patterns again since these are very different and offer quite a challenge.

This design is based around mid-century themes and uses colours from the mid-century palette to produce a bold, no-nonsense and rather eye-catching fabric. The background is crimson while the motif colours are cyclamen, moss green, anchusa (it’s a flower), canary, Post Office red, magnolia and chocolate – all from the mid-century palette. That is a lot of colours and looking at the design I can see most of them so it must be right.

To list the credits again; the model is from Daz Studio (it’s a Genesis figure), the set (such as it is) is my own, created and rendered in Cinema 4D and the all-important pattern was designed in Affinity Designer.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Free Blue Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Free Blue Pattern

Not all patterns have to have elements that fill the canvas and are which are arranged to repeat neatly in rows or columns and departing from this theme often produces some pleasant results.

Again, from the outset, this was intended as a mid-century type design that was not going to follow the regimented path – although for the most part mid-century patterns were well behaved in this regard. I tried deliberately to create a pattern that was a repeated trail – it must be repeated otherwise it isn’t a pattern. The result is surprisingly pleasing and harmonious as well as being nicely and satisfyingly coloured.

The background is a fabric type of bitmap created in Filter Forge while the colours used for the motif are shown as midnight blue, marine blue and turquoise blue for one element set and Paris green, marble green and moss green for the other. Looking at the finished pattern (it is one of the variations of the original), I can see that some of the colours – moss green for example – has been dropped.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here