Ryelands Part 2 – More And Bigger Changes

The previous two images in this series took a room which was decorated in a modern form with plain white walls and applied wallpaper in order to create a quite different and, I think, engaging look.

I commented in the last post that this room could perhaps be improved by improving the rather anaemic looking patterns that are being used on the cushions, the curtains, the pouffe and the carpet. I admit that the patterns that are used are somewhat unimaginative but they do, in my opinion, represent the sort of patterns that people are using now.

My idea was to create a stronger, bolder design that would bring out the dimensions and shape of the individual objects rather than seeking to camouflage them against a uniform backdrop of colour.

I therefore created five separate patterns (in fact these are Belle Epoque 2 designs that I had previously designed) and applied these to the items above. The result is the image that you see and, to make this clear, I have combined all of the patterns into a composite which you will also see above.

I think, and it is a matter of personal taste, that this room looks infinitely better than the previous two because each of the individual components in the room has a definite and understandable identity. However, I have tried not to make the room look too strong or too bold because I want this to be a room which is also relaxing for the homeowner. But I did want to create a room which would be a statement for the owner and a representation of their own taste and style and thus make the room look unique rather than it simply looking like all the other modern rooms that one sees so often.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Ryelands Part 1 – Changing The Wallpaper

The images above show the living room in a fairly typical suburban house in the United Kingdom as it would look decorated to current modern ideas.

The walls are painted white as it is the paintwork (which includes the door and the skirting to the room) and the floor has modern wooden floorboards, intended to look like a laminated floor. Colour and interest are provided by the decoration on the curtains, the pouffe, the main rug and the cushions on the sofa.

The room, finished in this way, is a pleasant one, light and airy and has a modern look to it. Although you only see part of the room, in my mind the unseen areas simply consistent of more walls making the room rectangular, the remaining walls having the same decoration.

The second image is exactly the same as the first image except that wallpaper has been applied to all of the walls and the effect is quite remarkable. Suddenly the room takes on a quite different look and seems to come alive. I think this is because the individual elements, the doorway, the sofa, the light, and the curtains are all framed against the wallpaper pattern. Again, in keeping with modern ideas, the wallpaper is not intrusive and is of a neutral colour with a very small Belle Epoque 2 pattern which, at the scale used, does not draw the eye and allows the walls to be complete in themselves.

I like the way that modern houses are decorated with very architecturally styled solid colours but I always feel that the house owner will soon find the rooms soulless and boring because of the lack of a decorated feel to them. Simply applying wallpaper to the walls, in my opinion, creates a room that looks as though it will retain interest over a much longer period of time.

This is a simple addition and it immediately raises the idea that we could experiment by brightening and decorating the look of the remaining items in the room. I shall try to do this in the next post.

I have not created this pattern as a wallpaper but if anyone would like to use it as such please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this and my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff466 Wallpaper

Bearing in mind what I have already said about this design’s origin, you would perhaps expect me to use a mid-century modern type room or even a mid-century interior in order to display the paper. In fact I did try this and it looked extremely good but, as I perhaps anticipated, it looks even better in a modern setting.

This set is designed to represent an upmarket apartment and here the wallpaper is used on one wall with the wall containing the windows and curtaining in a solid colour. If this were being used for real, the wallpaper would be used on two of the walls with the remaining two walls being plain. In fact, the curtains take up a good part of the left-hand wall.

The scale is the right sort of size to show off the motifs but without making them too much of a feature. One annoyance which I could not see when I first produced the image but which I think I can see now is that the pattern does create a line of motifs running across the wall. This is something that I, and most other designers, try to avoid like the plague but now that I have seen it, and it is only slight, it is difficult not to see it in the pattern.

I think that this wallcovering gives a pleasant, open and very friendly look to the room and I am pleased with the result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff446 Pattern And Wallpaper

In this pattern I have tried to create a design which could have come from the 1950s but which I have tried to make more up to date so that it looks a little more modern and a little less old-fashioned.

Designs like this appeared in the 1950s and, so far as I’m aware, they were completely fresh in that patterns like this had not really appeared before. I think it is also fair to say that, as the decade progressed, designs like this tended to disappear and have only begun to resurface with the interest in mid-century modern.

Many of these patterns were designed as wallpaper and it is for this use that I saw this design. I therefore used my mid-century modern room which has a long wall in order to show how the pattern would look as wallpaper. The swatch shows the background lighter but I wanted to create a warmer look to the wall so I used a slightly darker background colour. The pattern was never intended, I believe, to be used as a very small scale although to show it off to its best it does need a fairly large room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 Curtains

I decided to see how this 1950s pattern could best be used, the pattern is a busy one and the colour and overall look are quite strong and so the obvious choice would be fashion or soft furnishings. I have never been able to produce realistic looking fashion mockups and so I endeavoured to create a curtain fabric.

The rooms that I usually use did not seem to take the pattern particularly well but I have found a room which began life as a mid-century inspired room and the pattern used here as curtains produced a very acceptable result.

I have shown the curtains as they appear open during daylight since I think that this gives the best idea of the pattern and the colouring. At night when the curtains are pulled the pattern is stronger, and a lot bolder and this adds to the excitement within the room making the window space very much a feature.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff442 Curtains

As I indicated, this pattern was created with the intention of making a textile file which I would then use as a texture. I therefore decided to try the design as curtain material.

The image above shows the design as it would look as curtain fabric in, for example, a hotel or a large upmarket apartment. The background is mid-century nightshade and this is a difficult colour to match and to work with and I therefore decided to make the surrounding colours nondescript and this seems to have worked well.

As you can see from the swatch in the previous post, the motif is small and I have deliberately kept the scale reasonably tiny and this gives a busy and interesting look to the curtains and helps to show off the height of the room. The small-scale also helps to make the pattern unobtrusive where otherwise it would catch the visitors eye and create a look that was too domineering for the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff439 Two Rooms – Two Styles

There are two patterns today, or at least the same pattern in two different colours, which are used to give a different look to the same room. One room is a conventional dining room such as may be found in an upmarket house in the United Kingdom while the other is the same room, perhaps after the property has been sold, but this time adapted as an ultramodern living room although still retaining some traditional values.

Both rooms have walls that are decorated, although in one the decoration is of a feature wall while the remaining walls are solid colours. In the other room the wallpaper is on all the walls and serves the purpose of providing a solid look to the walls whilst giving the walls a different feel with their decoration.

The design is a simple one and for this reason I have not included a swatch. The colours are mid-century colours such as could have been found at any time in that period. It is, however, true that so far as walls are concerned they were normally light coloured although reverse pattern wallpaper certainly did exist and was used. Although this is mid-century inspired, the rooms and the look are completely modern and up-to-date.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.