Lovely Mid-Century Inspired Curtains

aff166Mid-century Inspired PatternI think plain curtains look dull and uninspiring in a room and, although they add to the overall colour and atmosphere, it’s a little like looking at flowers all the same colour – nice but you keep thinking how much better they could be.

This design, sourced from mid-century motifs and patterns and using mid-century colours, was intended for fabric and also for curtaining and here, in the living area of a room, it looks superb as a backdrop. Imagine how cosy this would be if you could see the whole room.

My notes, unfortunately, don’t reveal the background but it looks like magnolia (I always start with that as a background) but the other colours are chestnut, marble green, montella, pine green, chocolate and mustard.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Patterned Curtain Material Design

aff165_1000aff165_01_mosaicCurtains can brighten, or otherwise change the outlook and atmosphere of a room in various ways. I like to think that this one adds to all of these considerably.

The pattern is mid-century inspired although it also has modern overtones while the colours are from the mid-century palette. According to my notes the background is golden brown while the motif uses middle brown, copra (the kernel of the coconut), montella, mustard and maple with magnolia and chocolate for the stroke.

The set is a simple one which was produced in Cinema 4D and is intended to show the pattern made into curtain material and used in a very normal living area.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Green Stripes

Mid-century Inspired Patternaff156_01_mosaicFabric seems to suffer from the same problem that I feel besets wallpaper in that it, too, is often devoid of patterning in so many modern fabrics. While this is good in that it enables you to produce large areas of colour or of texture, the downside is that the rooms that it creates can seem drab, lifeless and lacking dimensionality.

I often feel, looking at images of such rooms, that I would soon tire of the surrounding or that I would feel bored and downcast at the lack of interest and stimulus.

This pattern, created in blues and greens from the mid-century palette, tries to inspire and to stimulate, bringing alive the large expanse of curtain at a window. I have deliberately chosen a simple set without the assistance of other items of furniture to show this effect.

The colours used are eau de nil for the background with Bredon green, fiesta blue and marine blue for the stripes.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains Swatch

This is a pattern which uses perhaps more modern ideas and motifs but with mid-century ideals and colours from the British Standard in use in the 1950s and 60s in the United Kingdom.

The design is the sort of design that might have been available in the 1950s and here I have adapted it as curtain material in a very ordinary mid-century living room. The effect is to make the curtains look clean and uncluttered and in that sense, they look modern. This could be an excellent design if used in a newly created mid-century room.

According to my notes the colour of the background is sky while the colours used in the motif are Paris green, middle brown and montella.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Mid-Century Net

Mid-century inspired pattern

Mid-Century Net

Mid-century inspired pattern

Mid-Century Net Swatch

Net curtains were used in almost 100% perfusion during the mid-century years in the United Kingdom and continued to be popular up until the turn of the century when, in many cases, they were replaced with blinds.

I think nets were very much taken for granted and probably not a lot of time was spent on choosing and most of the designs seemed to echo those of the pre-ware days. However, it is fun to make them and try to get them to look real and so I have spent some time designing and modelling to create the net curtain set above. This room is lifted from my 1960s bedroom set which you will have seen before.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Chaotic Sixties Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Chaotic Sixties Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Chaotic Sixties Curtains Swatch

The mid-1960s was a time when colours got bolder, patterns got brighter and the world seemed, and to an extent was, a great deal more fun than it had been.

This mid-century exuberance for life showed itself in the patterns and colours that we always associate as mid-century although they began in the second half of the 1960s decade in the United Kingdom.

This pattern is intended for curtains and is designed to show the sort of colours used along with the sort of motif. The pattern is a busy one and is designed to be noticed and to catch the eye. I have shown the curtains in a somewhat restrained room decorated with 1950s wallpaper in order to highlight the design although, in fact, the wallpaper may well have been equally flamboyant!

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

1950’s Mask Bedroom Curtains

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

1950’s Mask Bedroom Curtains

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

1950’s Mask Bedroom Curtains Swatch

I have been busy producing curtain patterns so that I have some choice when it comes to creating the final images for the various rooms involved in the mid-century 1950s project.

This design, it is called masks, is my own creation although I think it is the sort of motif that could have been used early mid-century and I have tried to produce a repeat pattern that looks like the type of curtaining which could have been purchased off-the-shelf at that time. The colour is Post-Office red for the background whilst the motif uses magnolia for the fill and for the stroke. These are both colours that would have been available, and would certainly have been used, in the late 1950s.

The room is my new 1950’s bedroom set. It is designed to recreate the sort of bedroom that would have been available in the United Kingdom in the middle to late years of that decade. As you can see, it is quite sparsely furnished since furniture was not that easy to buy new and, following the war, there was not a ready supply available second hand.

The wardrobe is perhaps an older piece that may well have been produced before or during the war whilst the dressing table and matching chest of drawers (which you will see later) are intended to represent 1950’s design. The bed, likewise, is perhaps an old item manufactured before or during the war and probably handed down since this would have been the bedroom of an unmarried son or daughter, or possibly a single adult. Following the war there were a great number of people who had lost loved ones and were on their own. For this reason, and partly because of the shortage of housing, a great number of people lived in extended families – something that does not seem to happen today.

As you can see, the carpets are what we would now call rugs covering the boarded floor. Fitted carpet was certainly available, now that tufted carpet had been created, although, once again, new carpet was quite expensive. It is perhaps a little later that all the rooms in a house would have had fitted carpet.

Since I want this room to look, to an extent, generic I have not included a lot of personal items and, indeed, the kind of personal items found in bedrooms today would not have been found in rooms of the 1950s. With the possible exception of transistor radios, which would have been available in the late 1950s, there was no entertainment other than perhaps a book and therefore bedrooms were places in which you slept.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.