Aff438 Pattern

Thinking about the idea of a new Belle Epoque set of patterns, I decided to look at the sort of designs created in the United Kingdom in the 1950s. They were, it has to be said, quite varied although these days the vast majority of patterns of this type tend to just use one or two particular shapes and a handful of colours.

With this in mind, I have created a design which suggests the 1950s and uses very straightforward shapes which would have been used at that time with colours which are definitely from the mid-century range of colours used in the 1950s. Patterns like this are difficult to use as fabric but they do make exceptionally good wall coverings which is why I intend to try and make this into a wallpaper which I will hopefully show later.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Wallpaper

I spent a little time this afternoon using this pattern as a three-dimensional texture to use for curtains to give a better idea of the concept that I had and how the pattern would look applied as curtaining.

I would like to say that this room was modelled on my own study but unfortunately it is part of a set representing a room in a stately home in the United Kingdom. However, I think that the pattern looks nice as curtains and that the effect when the curtains are open is a pleasant one catching the eye of a visitor and helping to maintain the high class finish of the room.

I must admit that the more I look at this pattern the more I am drawn to it and the more I think that it does fit with my developing ideas of a new Belle Epoque and I hope that you like this image.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Pattern

This pattern, I believe, goes very much to the heart of Belle Epoque 2 and creates a design that is exactly the sort of design that is intended to beautify and enhance a modern dwelling.

As all my designs, this pattern shares a mid-century feel for the motif and, naturally, uses colours from the mid-century palette. The effect that I tried to create was one of dense colour and pattern and also to instil in the design a sense of happiness and well-being.

If I have succeeded, then this will be an excellent pattern to use for soft furnishings and I can see it being used both for cushions designed for accent and for curtains intended to be noticed and which are used for effect.

I now have my computer working again for 3D and so I am hoping to spend a little time today, if I am able, to create a visualisation using this pattern.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff435 Feature Wall Pattern

More Belle Epoque 2 today, I began this design thinking of the patterns that I had created in the last few days and looking back at some of the fantastic and original work created at the turn-of-the-century in Europe.

Although the basic design has mid-century roots and, for this one, mid-century colouring from the extended British palette, it does owe something to the look of earlier decades. In fact this applies to much of the pioneering design work of the 1950s.

I saw this, and created it, to be a wallcovering for a feature wall. My actual thoughts were to use it for a small area of wall which was intended to take the visitors eye and become part of a main feature for the room. I have been a little lax in creating 3D interior visualisation scenes of late but I intend today to find time to use this wallcovering in a room and show in more detail precisely what I had in mind.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff434 Pattern

With my ideas about a new Belle Epoque in mind, I created this pattern which I thought expressed the ideas that I had quite well and which would look good as a fabric perhaps for soft furnishings or even for fashion.

The basic motifs are mid-century in their origin although the colouring, for this particular piece, is not true to the decades. The colours began as mid-century but they have been shifted slightly up in the spectrum thus giving the pattern, I believe, a more modern and contemporary look.

I did try this pattern as a texture to use on curtains in a three-dimensional scene that I was creating and I was pleased with the result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff433 Inconsequential Wall Covering

Wallpaper can, of course, the bold and striking and designed to catch the eye of visitor is as a room is entered. But often it is wanted to direct a visitor’s attention to some other element in the room rather than focus attention on the walls. In such a case should the walls be a plain colour or texture?

This is a good option but it does rather miss the chance to provide a gentle undulation to the walls in order to prevent them from being plain and solid and, perhaps, boring. This wallpaper is not designed to catch the eye but it is intended to make a wall look interesting and to prevent it from looking too ‘solid’.

The pattern is made from leaves and flower elements that have mid-century roots and the whole is coloured using mid-century colours from the British Standard palette in use at the time. On a wall in a large room this wallpaper would look inconsequential yet its effect on the overall structure of the room should not be underestimated.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff432 Belle Epoque 2 Pattern

This design was made for wallpaper but, in the event, it now seems that it is quite unsuitable even for a feature wall as the pattern is too bold and the colouring too stark.

However, when I had finished the pattern and realised that it was not working the way that I wanted, I tried some colour variations and, although these proved more suitable, they took away from the design some of the essence and life that I had created. A moment’s thought persuaded me that I should keep this design as a soft furnishing pattern for use, for example as a design for cushioning.

Sometimes, it is better to go with the flow of your idea rather than attempt to change a pattern simply to make it fit into one of the boxes in your mind. I thought it was worthwhile putting this pattern up both as a soft furnishing pattern but also to make the point above. Aside from all this, the design was created as a Belle Epoque 2 design and I have to say that I feel that it fits all of my criteria for that purpose.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.