Ryelands Part 1 – Changing The Wallpaper

The images above show the living room in a fairly typical suburban house in the United Kingdom as it would look decorated to current modern ideas.

The walls are painted white as it is the paintwork (which includes the door and the skirting to the room) and the floor has modern wooden floorboards, intended to look like a laminated floor. Colour and interest are provided by the decoration on the curtains, the pouffe, the main rug and the cushions on the sofa.

The room, finished in this way, is a pleasant one, light and airy and has a modern look to it. Although you only see part of the room, in my mind the unseen areas simply consistent of more walls making the room rectangular, the remaining walls having the same decoration.

The second image is exactly the same as the first image except that wallpaper has been applied to all of the walls and the effect is quite remarkable. Suddenly the room takes on a quite different look and seems to come alive. I think this is because the individual elements, the doorway, the sofa, the light, and the curtains are all framed against the wallpaper pattern. Again, in keeping with modern ideas, the wallpaper is not intrusive and is of a neutral colour with a very small Belle Epoque 2 pattern which, at the scale used, does not draw the eye and allows the walls to be complete in themselves.

I like the way that modern houses are decorated with very architecturally styled solid colours but I always feel that the house owner will soon find the rooms soulless and boring because of the lack of a decorated feel to them. Simply applying wallpaper to the walls, in my opinion, creates a room that looks as though it will retain interest over a much longer period of time.

This is a simple addition and it immediately raises the idea that we could experiment by brightening and decorating the look of the remaining items in the room. I shall try to do this in the next post.

I have not created this pattern as a wallpaper but if anyone would like to use it as such please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this and my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff542 As Gift Bags

So now we have the wrapping paper as it would appear turned into two gift bags which are now ready to be filled with goodies. I have to be honest and say that I am very pleased with the way that this pattern has evolved and I like the look of the design when used for this purpose.

I think the directional properties, which are quite obvious in the design, make the gift bags look all the more attractive and invite the recipient to look inside.

Although the original roots of this project and its colouring are mid-century, the pattern has come a long way when used as a Belle Epoque 2 design and this does make me want to create more designs like this.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff542 Pattern

I suppose I need hardly comment that this is a Belle Epoque 2 pattern intended for wrapping paper and is designed to have a bold and directional look.

The motives are simply taken from my collection of mid-century motifs and bear a resemblance to those that could have been used in the 1950s. The colouring, too, is taken from my extended British palette that would have been in use during the mid-century years in the United Kingdom.

I intend to turn this into wrapping paper and my initial thoughts are that, with its directional properties, it would make an excellent paper from which to construct gift bags.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff541 As Carpet On Stairs

After I had finished the previous post where I had created the set showing the carpet in the living room of a conventional house, I began to think about the scale that I had used. In fact, I began to wonder how the carpet would look at a smaller scale.

Following some experimentation, I decided to use my old stairs design which was originally created for the 1966 house project several years ago and which I recently bought up-to-date with the express intention of using it as a carpet set.

The result is the image above where you see the design as carpet used both on the floor and on the stairs. Here it is used at a slightly tighter scale where it loses the free flow but still looks extremely good although, it has to be said, it does lose something of my vision for Belle Epoque 2. However, the purpose of making interior surface patterns is to produce a design which looks good however it is used and enhances and beautifies the interior space which I believe this does. It was also a fun project to make which makes it all the more rewarding to do!

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff541 As Carpet

As I explained in the previous post this pattern is not quite Belle Epoque 2 because of the way that it is constructed but it was interesting to see how it works as a carpet where the requirement is for it to flow across the surface without looking too interrupted.

The set is a simple one with just a sofa and a carpet fitted to the contours of the room and at the scale shown, which is larger than I would usually use for Belle Epoque 2, the carpet does flow across the room highlighting the dimensions and enhancing the look.

The colours are mid-century from my extended palette and give a solid, interesting look to the space which I am sure would allow the interesting use of contrast in the final interior design.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff541 Pattern

This design has all the elements of Belle Epoque 2 from the way that it is constructed although, it has to be said, it is different from most of the other patterns in this series that I have posted so far. The design is constructed to allow for the motif to flow from one to another and so, to an extent, this destroys the idea of the fast repeat since this becomes much less obvious.

However, having said that, it still does have most of the elements that make Belle Epoque 2 looks so good. With the good looks, it was designed for use as an interior soft furnishing design although it is possible that I may decide to use it as a carpet texture because I have a feeling that it would excel in this role.

The design is constructed using basic elements that look, on the face of it, quite mid-century while the colouring, too, is from the same period. At the scale shown, the pattern looks quite together although at a smaller scale it does begin to look more like a Belle Epoque 2 design as the repeat becomes more obvious.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff540 As Sofa Material

I have to admit to being a little, or maybe a lot, conservative in my choice of upholstery fabric which reflects the type of material that was available and was used mid-century to cover sofas and chairs. This does not reflect the modern ideas of using much bolder and much more colourful material for soft furnishing which is why I decided to use the Belle Epoque 2 designs as sofa fabric.

Although I created the design with the intention of using the pattern at a small scale, perhaps smaller than that shown on the swatch which I posted yesterday, I have now had to have a change of heart. At a small scale this pattern looks bitty and quite out of place as a sofa fabric pattern. But at a larger scale the sofa becomes alive and it begins to look larger and much more comfortable than it did before.

To be honest, I am not completely sure that I like a fabric this light on a sofa and I do not think that I would be the first to rush out and buy one. However this is the sort of look that I see in interior magazines that I view each month so maybe it is right. Maybe you will like this, maybe you are more modern than am I.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.