Sur La Beach en bleu

The last room was quite personal and various people suggested that perhaps I should, as I normally would, simply choose a theme for the room and redo it again. Blue is a colour that I like and which, for no particular reason, I tend not to use to any great extent so I thought I would create a blue room and see if my use of patterns found more favour.

The wallpaper and the sofa fabric are both Belle Epoque 2 patterns and, whilst the sofa fabric is designed to be very regular, the wallpaper was created with a slight jink in the pattern which takes the eye and relieves the monotony. Both the curtains and the carpet are variations of old patterns that I have done before and serve to provide pleasing decorative features to the room.

In this design the walls and carpet are light while the sofa and curtains are dark and the furniture in the room is painted white. An interesting alternative is to colour the furniture, perhaps a midnight blue to match the sofa, although this does create a rather sombre look to the room.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Sur La Beach Part 1 Easy Wall Covering

This is a project to look at a way to create a wallpaper that mimics the look of a painted wall but which takes that look further by giving the wall an identity and feel that make it much more interesting and which help to bring the room to life. So many modern rooms have single, neutral walls which create that now standard boring, clinical and somewhat drab look as though they were rooms on a university campus.

These images show an upmarket apartment living room with the walls painted in a bright, light neutral colour and then the same room with wallpaper in two different Belle Epoque 2 influenced patterns but which echo the colouring so that the overall look of the room is not changed. What is changed, however, is the feel and ambience as well as the character of the room both for the homeowner and the visitor.

Both of the two images where wallpaper is used in the room seem to have a much more decorated and planned look and both of these images, to me, look more homely and make the room seem more inviting. It is not often that comparisons like this are made and it is very interesting to compare the three different images and see how one feels about each one. Perhaps then you can choose which one is the one that creates the room in which you think you would feel most at home

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

N08 Fabric Design

This pattern, which is a variation of a pattern created previously, has been made to use as a fabric pattern and in particular for soft furnishings within the home.

The design, I suppose, falls within Belle Epoque 2 as it has a small motif and a reasonably fast repeat along with bright colours that have a good contrast.

I have tried this design as it would look if it were made into curtain material and I was pleased with the result and so it is likely that you will see this design again in one of my finished rooms. The light background makes the colours stand out and shows off the pattern and the way the design should be used. For this reason I had in mind longer areas of fabric than cushions.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Ryelands Part 1 – Changing The Wallpaper

The images above show the living room in a fairly typical suburban house in the United Kingdom as it would look decorated to current modern ideas.

The walls are painted white as it is the paintwork (which includes the door and the skirting to the room) and the floor has modern wooden floorboards, intended to look like a laminated floor. Colour and interest are provided by the decoration on the curtains, the pouffe, the main rug and the cushions on the sofa.

The room, finished in this way, is a pleasant one, light and airy and has a modern look to it. Although you only see part of the room, in my mind the unseen areas simply consistent of more walls making the room rectangular, the remaining walls having the same decoration.

The second image is exactly the same as the first image except that wallpaper has been applied to all of the walls and the effect is quite remarkable. Suddenly the room takes on a quite different look and seems to come alive. I think this is because the individual elements, the doorway, the sofa, the light, and the curtains are all framed against the wallpaper pattern. Again, in keeping with modern ideas, the wallpaper is not intrusive and is of a neutral colour with a very small Belle Epoque 2 pattern which, at the scale used, does not draw the eye and allows the walls to be complete in themselves.

I like the way that modern houses are decorated with very architecturally styled solid colours but I always feel that the house owner will soon find the rooms soulless and boring because of the lack of a decorated feel to them. Simply applying wallpaper to the walls, in my opinion, creates a room that looks as though it will retain interest over a much longer period of time.

This is a simple addition and it immediately raises the idea that we could experiment by brightening and decorating the look of the remaining items in the room. I shall try to do this in the next post.

I have not created this pattern as a wallpaper but if anyone would like to use it as such please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this and my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff542 As Gift Bags

So now we have the wrapping paper as it would appear turned into two gift bags which are now ready to be filled with goodies. I have to be honest and say that I am very pleased with the way that this pattern has evolved and I like the look of the design when used for this purpose.

I think the directional properties, which are quite obvious in the design, make the gift bags look all the more attractive and invite the recipient to look inside.

Although the original roots of this project and its colouring are mid-century, the pattern has come a long way when used as a Belle Epoque 2 design and this does make me want to create more designs like this.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff542 Pattern

I suppose I need hardly comment that this is a Belle Epoque 2 pattern intended for wrapping paper and is designed to have a bold and directional look.

The motives are simply taken from my collection of mid-century motifs and bear a resemblance to those that could have been used in the 1950s. The colouring, too, is taken from my extended British palette that would have been in use during the mid-century years in the United Kingdom.

I intend to turn this into wrapping paper and my initial thoughts are that, with its directional properties, it would make an excellent paper from which to construct gift bags.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff541 As Carpet On Stairs

After I had finished the previous post where I had created the set showing the carpet in the living room of a conventional house, I began to think about the scale that I had used. In fact, I began to wonder how the carpet would look at a smaller scale.

Following some experimentation, I decided to use my old stairs design which was originally created for the 1966 house project several years ago and which I recently bought up-to-date with the express intention of using it as a carpet set.

The result is the image above where you see the design as carpet used both on the floor and on the stairs. Here it is used at a slightly tighter scale where it loses the free flow but still looks extremely good although, it has to be said, it does lose something of my vision for Belle Epoque 2. However, the purpose of making interior surface patterns is to produce a design which looks good however it is used and enhances and beautifies the interior space which I believe this does. It was also a fun project to make which makes it all the more rewarding to do!

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.