Aff442 Curtains

As I indicated, this pattern was created with the intention of making a textile file which I would then use as a texture. I therefore decided to try the design as curtain material.

The image above shows the design as it would look as curtain fabric in, for example, a hotel or a large upmarket apartment. The background is mid-century nightshade and this is a difficult colour to match and to work with and I therefore decided to make the surrounding colours nondescript and this seems to have worked well.

As you can see from the swatch in the previous post, the motif is small and I have deliberately kept the scale reasonably tiny and this gives a busy and interesting look to the curtains and helps to show off the height of the room. The small-scale also helps to make the pattern unobtrusive where otherwise it would catch the visitors eye and create a look that was too domineering for the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Wallpaper

I spent a little time this afternoon using this pattern as a three-dimensional texture to use for curtains to give a better idea of the concept that I had and how the pattern would look applied as curtaining.

I would like to say that this room was modelled on my own study but unfortunately it is part of a set representing a room in a stately home in the United Kingdom. However, I think that the pattern looks nice as curtains and that the effect when the curtains are open is a pleasant one catching the eye of a visitor and helping to maintain the high class finish of the room.

I must admit that the more I look at this pattern the more I am drawn to it and the more I think that it does fit with my developing ideas of a new Belle Epoque and I hope that you like this image.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff435 Feature Wallpaper

As I said I would, I spent a little time creating a new 3D file using this particular image as a wallcovering for a feature wall. After some thought, I decided to use the modern dining room with the nice bifold doors leading out onto the garden.

The purpose of this wallpaper is to provide a feature for the visitor as they enter the room. Obviously you cannot see the entire room but you have to imagine that the door is in the right hand wall positioned somewhere in front of the seating area. The whole scene has two sofas facing one another with an occasional table in between.

I have used a slightly bigger scale than that shown in the swatch in the last post because that seemed to suit the space better and to make the wall look more obvious and decorated. Using a smaller scale had a similar effect but here the wall looked more uniformly coloured, an idea that I was anxious to avoid. Thinking about the look of the room I was pleased with the result and, were this my living and dining area, I would be happy with the colours and the look that has been created.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1970s London Flat

Part of a London flat designed at would have been in the late 1970sThis is a fashionable apartment or, since I have placed it in London, a fashionable flat, which might have existed towards the latter half of the 1970s.

Property in London was, and still is, expensive and this is a large living area and so the flat would be a relatively upmarket one, perhaps in a nice area of the city. The furnishings I have tried to make relevant to the period and to the sort of ideas there were in vogue at that time.

The design of the suite is one that I remember seeing at the time and which impressed me, although it would be difficult to find a similar one today. It comes with a three-seat and a two-seat sofa, a chair and a matching coffee table. You will see that, in common with today, one of the occupants has removed their shoes and kicked them under the table!

The small pictures either side of curtains are reminiscent of the sort of images that were appearing at that time and owe much to the work of the American artist Andy Warhol. Pictures, as a way of decoration, were beginning to appear in quantity and were often grouped in a simple way. This is particularly true where, as in this case, the images all share a common theme.

The layout of the room, with the arrangement of the sofas facing the television, is very reminiscent of the way that rooms are constructed today and follows the grouping of furniture that took place in the 1960s. A decade earlier and the furnishings would have been laid out very differently during the 1950s when television was only beginning and most people, at least in Britain, listened to the radio.

The carpet on the floor deadens the sounds and provides insulation as well as making the room look and feel cosy. The curtains have a bold print which would not look out of place today. Something else which has not changed much are the lights, both the ceiling and the stand-alone spotlights. There is a mains powered radio on the bookcase on the left and that, too, would not look out of place today.

The image above is a very small one and only part of the room, the whole can be seen much clearer on my Flickr page, a link to which is provided in the next paragraph.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Green Executive 1960s Room

Image created from a 3D model of a 1960s style roomThis is something of a departure for me and an interesting project to work on. The room is from the early 1960s and is designed as a large living room in an executive style house somewhere in the United Kingdom.

As you can see, the room is a large one with a dining annex which is set at one end. This is an interesting configuration although perhaps not the most practical one since food has to be carried through the seating area from the kitchen.

The furnishings are the sort of furnishings that would have been found in a property of this description in the early 1960s and feature a small statue on the occasional table, pictures printed onto canvas rather than within frames and, of course, the excellent lights that were appearing at that time. It is interesting that two of these items, the lights and the statue, seem to have disappeared from modern living areas.

The carpet has already been featured on this blog and needs little further comment other than to say that I am pleased with the result. The wallcovering is a simple one that reflects the period but which is in a colour that is a little unusual although, I think, very effective at creating a cool, smart room.

Sitting looking at the image ready to post and feeling somewhat nostalgic, I have to say that, were it possible, I would very much like to be able to walk into and continue living in it. (In the early 1960s, of course!)

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Carpet From The 1960s

Two mid-century style carpet texturesI know I have said this before but I began producing patterns by making textures to wrap around 3D objects that I had created for interior views of rooms. The reason being that there were, at that time and it was a few years ago, very few textures for wallpapers, soft furnishings and other areas of a mid-century room that used patterns.

I am about to start on a room from the beginning of the 1960s (which is much more familiar territory) and in preparation I am trying to create more realistic looking carpet. The image above represents my first attempts using Filter Forge and the excellent Ruggestry filter created by DreamWarrior. The colours used are sampled from carpet designs of the 1960s decade.

I have used this filter before but this time I wanted to try combining it with the effects in Photo Paint by Corel to see if I could create a more realistic material. The results are above and, although not as good as I would like, they are much better than I have used before.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1989 Living Room Right Hand View

A living room in 1989 - the third and final image which shows the right hand viewThis is the right hand and final view of the 1989 living room and, for such a large and time-consuming project, this seems to come round quite quickly. One final step to complete the project is to produce a movie of, essentially, the same images but taken as the camera revolves and this is something I will work on this week despite the electrical work which is going on around me and will necessitate turning off the power for one possibly two days.

This scene shows the way in which hi-fi was taking over the living spaces in rooms particularly with the influx of available forms of media. Although this looks cumbersome and probably from a modern perspective, antiquated, this was to lay the foundations for the way in which media is presented today although, of course, none of it was streamed.

Again, since this is a forward-looking family, there are ‘Andy Warhol’ style prints on the walls which provide some colour and interest. One feature to note is that people still tended to have quite a lot of ornamentation on furniture such as wall units. However, this ostentation was beginning to disappear and by the advent of the next decade much of the ornamentation that you see will have gone. In order to prepare for this I have included vases and the like on the unit and the storage on one wall but I have tried to keep other ornamentation to a minimum.

I am Midcentury Styles and so I will not do a room in the next decade which would be very different with wood floors, less patterns and many more solid areas of colour.

This image is much smaller than the final image which I will post in its entirety on Flickr, the link being below.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.