Aff467 Curtains

Following on from the post this morning, I tried to use my mannequin set to create a fashion image but unfortunately I was unable to produce a realistic looking design from the mockup and so I had to reconsider what I was to do with this design.

As well as fashion, I realised that it would be suitable as a fabric pattern and the most obvious and demonstrative use would be as curtain material. I therefore had a look at the sets that I had available and decided that a traditional British drawing room set would be the most appropriate. The illustration that you see above is the use of the pattern as curtain material in a very upmarket drawing room where I think it looks nice.

Having looked at the image several times I am now convinced that it makes a better curtain material design than it would have a fashion pattern.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff466 Wallpaper

Bearing in mind what I have already said about this design’s origin, you would perhaps expect me to use a mid-century modern type room or even a mid-century interior in order to display the paper. In fact I did try this and it looked extremely good but, as I perhaps anticipated, it looks even better in a modern setting.

This set is designed to represent an upmarket apartment and here the wallpaper is used on one wall with the wall containing the windows and curtaining in a solid colour. If this were being used for real, the wallpaper would be used on two of the walls with the remaining two walls being plain. In fact, the curtains take up a good part of the left-hand wall.

The scale is the right sort of size to show off the motifs but without making them too much of a feature. One annoyance which I could not see when I first produced the image but which I think I can see now is that the pattern does create a line of motifs running across the wall. This is something that I, and most other designers, try to avoid like the plague but now that I have seen it, and it is only slight, it is difficult not to see it in the pattern.

I think that this wallcovering gives a pleasant, open and very friendly look to the room and I am pleased with the result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff466 Design

Once again I have been thinking about my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 patterns and looking back at both the patterns created at the turn-of-the-century in Europe and also the designs that were being used in the United Kingdom, and in Europe, in the 1950s. Whilst the motifs and the way that the motives are used together are very different there is still an overall similarity in motif placement and in the way that the scale is used as well as the fast repeat.

To capitalise on this I have taken a 1950s decade idea and used some perhaps more modern designs for the motif and presented this using mid-century colours taken from my range of British Standard colours used at the time. I have, however, chosen those colours that I think more closely resemble the sort of colours that are used today.

I always have an idea in my mind of the final use for my patterns and this is intended as a wallpaper pattern for a feature wall, although a feature wall that is not intended to be too noticeable. This is the sort of wall where you want to catch the visitors eye when they enter the room but you do not want the design on the wall to dominate the space or to dictate choices within the room for other designs and colours. I shall spend a little time this afternoon using the pattern as a texture in Cinema 4D and see if I can produce a room that satisfies all these requirements.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff465 Carpet Design

I considered the prospect of moving house recently and I reviewed several possible houses and noticed that all but one had wooden floors. I have to admit to being impressed by the look of floorboards although I know from experience that the reality is not quite as good.

Wooden floors are not as cosy as carpet nor are they as warm underfoot although they are, perhaps, simply to keep clean. What I dislike about them is the look of poverty that they bring to a room which is quite different from the richness and sometimes opulence of a good quality carpet.

This design was intended as carpet and was, I suppose, my attempt to create a design that I would like to have seen in one or more of the houses that I viewed. The inspiration for the pattern is from 1950s United Kingdom designs and, as ever, the colouring is taken from colours which were used at the time. I have taken the liberty of picking the brighter and nicer hues to create a design which is both homely, comforting and, I hope, opulent.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff449 Pattern

I intended to use this pattern as wallpaper, and it was part of the wallpaper sequence that I have been showing over the last few posts. Having arrived at the final image I began to wonder whether I could use this as fabric instead of wallpaper.

Experimentation soon showed me that this was not really a suitable pattern to use as fabric and so, I am afraid, it will be yet another wallcovering. This does illustrate that making patterns for paper and patterns for fabric are really two quite different things.

This motif is a simple mid-century flower pattern and the colours, although numerous, are all from the mid-century colours in use at the time.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff448 Wallpaper Idea

One of the big advantages of using 3D models in order to show how a pattern would look when actually used on a product is that you can see immediately where you need to make changes.

This design went well as wallpaper but it looked very lonely with so much separation between the motifs. That is, it looked good, I thought, as a pattern but once I had used it as a texture on the walls in this room it became obvious that it did not look the way that I wanted.

I amended the pattern by adding in some simple mid-century style lines in order to fill out the pattern and make it look a little more unified on the wall. I also changed the background colour to Yaffle Green (yaffle is the old name in the UK for a woodpecker), a mid-century colour from the British Standard in use at the time.

Having now produced the final image, I am now happy that the wallcovering looks the way that I wanted which is a mid-century, 1950s look but brought completely up-to-date and suitable for a modern room today.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff448 Pattern

This is very much in the 1950s tradition in the United Kingdom but it has, I hope you will agree, been bought up-to-date and suitable to consider as a modern wallpaper pattern.

The motif resembles the ‘boomerang’ shape that appeared and was used extensively in that decade. The colouring is from my extended British Standard range of colours that were in use at the time. I have used Magnolia for the background and a range of colours including the nicely named cobweb, along with mimosa, mustard, light grey and aurora.

At a small scale this will obviously fit in with my idea of Belle Epoque 2 but if I use too small a scale as wallpaper then the result is going to look very bitty to a visitor to the room standing at the doorway. My instinct is to use a medium scale so that from a distance the individual motifs will be recognisable. I am proposing to use this as a texture in a modern apartment living room and we will have to wait to see the final result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.