Pattern Aff369

Late 1960s British patternThis pattern is a 1960s mid-century design that tries to emulate the sort of patterns and experimentation that was going on in the latter half of the 1960s in the United Kingdom. It was this part of the decade that generated so much innovation and unusual ideas and which is responsible for producing so much of what we now think of as British mid-century.

This pattern is shown here as a swatch and was created by me as a design for soft furnishings with a view to using it on both curtains and cushions. Against the, perhaps more run-of-the-mill soft furnishings designs that were available at that time, this pattern is intended for a very modern and up-to-the-minute room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Pattern Aff368

Mid-century pattern inspired by earlier designsNo, I have not forgotten that I also make surface patterns although, as I have said before, I began life making 3D interiors and then started making surface patterns for areas such as wallpaper, curtains and soft fabrics because I was unable to find any suitable ones, particularly mid-century ones, on the Internet.

I had let my surface pattern creation rather take over recently and I am redressing the balance by doing a little more mid-century interior architectural visualisation but this pattern was one made sometime back and has been waiting for me to bring forward.

Mid-century inspired? It is easy to see that its origins lie in the early years of that century although patterns like this did have something of a renaissance and were used as inspiration during the mid-century years.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1980s Fashion Pattern

1980s fashion patternI am in the process of producing the first image for the 1980s room which I hope will be finished shortly as, while I am dictating this, the image is being processed.

Whilst we wait, I was looking through some 1980s photographs and I saw a pattern on a dress which particularly caught my eye. The pattern was at a very small-scale and those who know me will know that I particularly like fast repeats. I therefore created a similar pattern and spent some time to get the pattern to look at least a little random. Anyone who creates surface patterns will know that it is all too easy to end up with a pattern which, when looked at from a distance, appears to have lines or boxes where there should just be pattern.

I have no real intention of using the design as a fashion pattern although I might have a look again at the mannequins that I produced some time back to see if it is possible to make those look good enough. The pattern was created using Affinity Designer.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Curtains For The 1989 House

Design in light yellow of medium size motifs for use as curtaining in the 1989 living room3D model of curtains in a hotel or function roomWe have the wallpaper, now this is the design for the curtains for the 1989 living room. There has always been, at least in mid-century times, a possibility of using the same fabric for various soft furnishings about the house so this curtain material could appear as cushions, or even as loose covers for a sofa or easy chair. I have not yet completed the design for the furniture although it may well be that I will use this pattern as the fabric for a cushion.

The design is a simple one and uses a motif that is a stylised version of a motif that goes back beyond Victorian times to the 17th century in the United Kingdom. If you look at designs that are used for fabric patterns, you will find that there are many motifs that owe their existence to the patterns created many, many centuries ago.

The colours are simple colours, the type of hues that would have been available to a designer at that time. The 1980s and 90s was on the cusp of the transition between ‘decorated’ interiors and the type of interior that we see today, which show much less decoration and more solid colours.

For that reason the pattern, as with the wallcovering, is created simply and easily without too much contrast in the colours or in the pattern. I have to admit to a liking for simple and easy design as much as I do the riotous and devil-may-care designs of the 1960s.

You, in fact, don’t see that much of the curtains in the room and so, to show the design better, I have used the curtains in this rather old set which was designed to resemble a large hotel or function room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Lively Coach Seats

A lively mid-century inspired pattern used on coach seatingJourneys by public transport are, at best, boring and often unwanted since a way of beaming us from A to B would be far more preferable. However, one way to relieve the boredom and make a journey a little more pleasant is by way of seat decoration.

In the past, seating in transport has often had some form of decoration applied and, as people in the United Kingdom will know, the tube, train and bus system in the UK has had some very imaginative and interesting patterns applied to seating which was often designed by top-class artists.

For my part, I see patterns in a very broad sense, particularly as I use them in my 3D work. As such I do enjoy making patterns for seating on both public and private transport and, as you can see from the illustration above, this pattern was made for coach seats. In the past, I have often said that, for long journeys, seat patterns should be a restful, saving the more lively patterns for short journeys. I still subscribe to this view but I think society is changing and I believe that bolder patterns can now be used on long-term seating such as the coach seats in this illustration.

The pattern is a simple and open one designed to catch the travellers eye and, hopefully, make their journey a little less stressful. The inspiration for the design is mid-century as is the colouring. The coach was not made by me, since I specialise in interior visualisation, but is the Nimos coach which is available from DAZ and is an excellent and very detailed model.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Biscuit Tin Pattern

box04 testSomething a little different, at least for this blog, is this pattern which was designed especially to cover a 3D biscuit tin that I was making for an apartment scene.

The design is mid-century in its inspiration as are, to a great extent, the colours and the intention was to try to create the look of circular biscuit tins which were popular at that time. It is not apparent from the picture but the tin is 10 cm high, approximately, and about 5 cm in girth.

The actual motif for the pattern, once again, is mid-century in its inspiration and I took the leaves and part of the design to decorate the top of the tin. For anyone who is interested, the tins were made in Cinema 4D and the decoration applied with Bodypaint.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Floral Bedroom Wallpaper

Bedroom wallpaper design of flowers against a light backgroundBedroom visualization using the wallpaperThis is a little different in that the wallpaper design uses a slightly different method of construction although the end result looks very straightforward.

This was created by using a separate background and the pattern is overlaid on top. The idea is to create a wall which looks simple and straightforward but which shows the background if you look a little closer. Looking at the image in its large form on Flickr you can see the effect of the background.

I think that the idea is mid century since I have seen wall coverings from that period which I think use this method while the colours, the few that are there, do reflect mid century values.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.