Swinging Sixties Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Swinging Sixties Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Swinging Sixties Wallpaper Swatch

The 1960s, particularly in the United Kingdom, was a fantastic time of invention, creation and of new ideas which changed forever the way that patterns were used and colours were created.

This design uses mid-century colours and to an extent mid-century shapes to create today what a 1960s wallcovering might have looked like. The set is my usual mid-century living room set but with both walls covered in this rather riotous but lovely mid-century design. The effect is to make the room look stunning and, it has to be said, more than a little busy. But that’s how it was in the later years of the 1960s decade; patterns were everywhere and mostly they were mixed in together with, it seems, little regard for aesthetics.

Today, of course, however much we like this pattern as a wallcovering or perhaps as a fabric, we would use it in a much more restrained way and in so doing we might make it look prettier and more acceptable but we would lose some of the raw excitement that this room generates.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Easy Mid-century Walls

Mid-century inspired pattern

Easy Mid-century Walls

Mid-century inspired pattern

Easy Mid-century Walls Swatch

Running into the 1960s decade in the United Kingdom, design was picking up quickly and new ideas had begun to be adopted, albeit a little slowly.

However, a look at the sort of wall coverings that were on offer in this period reveals that many householders were choosing more conservative offerings rather than the new designs.

This wallpaper pattern could have come out of the decade before both in its motif and in its colours but there were many designs like this that were available in the shops and we assume were purchased. I have to say this wallpaper does have a clean and easy-on-the-eye look and I do have to be honest and say that it is a pattern that I quite like for that reason.

According to my notes, the colours are mustard and bottle green with a chocolate stroke while the background is the ever present and much-loved, mid-century magnolia.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Middle Of The Decade Walls

Mid-century inspired pattern

Middle Of The Decade Walls

Mid-century inspired pattern

Middle Of The Decade Walls Swatch

There was a lot of pent up design energy generated in the 1950s and the early years of the 1960s which came to a head in the mid-century decades.

It was then that interior decoration changed forever with the advent of big, bold, eye-catching patterns and solid, brassy. well-saturated colours. The strange thing was that almost all homemakers, who previously in the early 1950s had been so conservative, revelled in the new look and took it to their hearts.

It is now that the icons that we call mid-century began to materialise as did many of the colours that we associate with that period. As a prelude, I have taken the 1950s dining room and shown it as it might have looked in that period.

My intention is to create an authentic room but, to modern eyes, the room looks cluttered and too full. However, this was a feature of mid-century decoration. It was usual to choose wallpaper, carpets and curtains without, perhaps, too much of an overall plan resulting in rooms that look like the image above rather than the much more stylised spaces that use mid-century elements today.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Chaotic Sixties Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Chaotic Sixties Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Chaotic Sixties Curtains Swatch

The mid-1960s was a time when colours got bolder, patterns got brighter and the world seemed, and to an extent was, a great deal more fun than it had been.

This mid-century exuberance for life showed itself in the patterns and colours that we always associate as mid-century although they began in the second half of the 1960s decade in the United Kingdom.

This pattern is intended for curtains and is designed to show the sort of colours used along with the sort of motif. The pattern is a busy one and is designed to be noticed and to catch the eye. I have shown the curtains in a somewhat restrained room decorated with 1950s wallpaper in order to highlight the design although, in fact, the wallpaper may well have been equally flamboyant!

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Psychedelic Bedcover

Mid-century inspired pattern

Psychedelic Bedcover

Mid-century inspired pattern

Psychedelic Bedcover Swatch

The mid-century 1960s decade in the United Kingdom began quietly enough but around the middle of the decade design, fashion and virtually every element of the settled world exploded into a riot of sound, vision and innovation.

In a short period of time, design went through many years of evolution and development and everything that appeared seemed new. It was an amazing time which has never been repeated since and perhaps never will.

So far as interiors were concerned a lot changed but the changes can really be explained by looking at the effect on the colours and the patterns. Colours became much brighter, much more saturated and vibrant and patterns were much denser and complex although the basic rules of repeat were still followed. Anything, it seemed, could be used to express the joy of being alive and it is these colours and designs which people think of when they look back to these mid-century decades.

As part of a 1960s room, I have created a new pattern which is used here on the bed cover. Both the bed, and room, a portion of which you see, represent this decade and, although it appears chaotic, this room would not have looked out of place as a teenage bedroom. To the modern eye it is the sort of room to which we say – Wow!

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Three Decades

Mid-century inspired pattern

Three Decades – the 1950s

Mid-century inspired pattern

Three Decades – 1960s and 1970s

Just a pattern today as this is both a mid-century design process and also an ongoing development process and hopefully there will be some similar further patterns that will appear here in the future.

Since I am presently looking at the 1950s mid-century period, the principal image above is a pattern designed for that period and intended primarily as a fabric design. However, it might be possible for it to be used as wallpaper if you accept that it is quite dark.

The exciting part is that I have also produced this as it would have looked a decade later in the 1960s. Here you will see the red background and also, I hope, appreciate the excitement and contrast that was spiralling around in that hectic and innovative period. Not content with that, I have designed it as it could have been created a further decade later in the 1970s (or even perhaps as a modern design today).

This was an interesting, and in its own way a very useful project since it did enable me to compare both styles and designs as well as colouring for the different decades and to stretch my mind and my thinking a little.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

“In conversation”

A Daz Iray render

Yes, I know it’s taken some time, but I have been involved with other 3D work which has taken more time than I thought. However, at last, my first Daz Iray render is finished.

The scene is, as I have posted before, the apartment building that I made some time back in Cinema 4D. The model was transferred to Daz Studio as a Wavefront Object file and textured in Daz studio using Iray textures created for the most part by me. I then added some furniture created in Cinema 4D and textured this the same way. One or two of the smaller extras are, in fact, Daz models since I did not have suitable models that I had made and which were already transferred as object files. (This is something I hope to render shortly.)

Once that was complete I used a HDRI file that I obtained free from the Internet as a background, getting the Iray render to draw the dome. One problem I encountered is that it does not appear possible to easily see what portion of the image will appear through the window and so some frustrating trial and error took place before I was able to find a suitable part of the picture.

I then took two Genesis 2 models from Daz and put them in conversation before saving them in Daz format. It was easy then to merge this file and then position the girls in front of the window in a natural pose.

The lighting is simple emission lighting for the room, the HDRI for outside and a spotlight, suitably positioned, for the sun.

Overall I suppose I must have spent a week playing with various renders, lighting and texturing setups before I settled on this final image and now I have to say that I am pleased with the result. In an ideal world I would have added some dirt to both the room and the furnishings rather than resort to Photoshop.

Is this the way to use representations of people in 3D work? I believe that it is, I think the standard of finish for Iray is very acceptable and using Daz Studio means that it is not necessary to fiddle with the facial textures of the models in order to make them look good. Will I try this again? Certainly, I have learned a lot and gained some valuable experience in both exporting models to Daz Studio and in producing an acceptable scene. Looking back, it was both frustrating and exciting but it is definitely a project that I will look at again in the near future.

For access to a full size image my Flickr page is here.