Aff475 1950’s Style Pattern

This is one of those patterns that is instantly recognisable as a 1950s design and is one of the set referred to as ‘Atomic’ because the motifs originated from the quite marvellous scientific images of atomic activity that were being produced and shown to the world in general.

As well as being instantly recognisable, they are also well liked by people although, I believe, that they have a slightly more limited usage. Sometimes we like decoration of a particular type and enjoy seeing it although we are less likely to use it in our homes. The reason for this, I think, is the there is a lot of contrast in the colours and in the motifs and this makes the pattern a little too disturbing and colourful to be suitable for either wallpaper or soft furnishings.

However, this does not stop me from creating these patterns and of this particular one I like both the colours, which are mid-century, and the motifs which I think would look perfectly in place during the mid-century 1950s.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 Curtains

I decided to see how this 1950s pattern could best be used, the pattern is a busy one and the colour and overall look are quite strong and so the obvious choice would be fashion or soft furnishings. I have never been able to produce realistic looking fashion mockups and so I endeavoured to create a curtain fabric.

The rooms that I usually use did not seem to take the pattern particularly well but I have found a room which began life as a mid-century inspired room and the pattern used here as curtains produced a very acceptable result.

I have shown the curtains as they appear open during daylight since I think that this gives the best idea of the pattern and the colouring. At night when the curtains are pulled the pattern is stronger, and a lot bolder and this adds to the excitement within the room making the window space very much a feature.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 1950’s Again!

I spent some time thinking about the purpose of pattern decoration and in looking back over the three decades that are of particular interest to me and which form the core of mid-century design. My particular interest is the relatively small-scale patterns that I refer to as fast repeats. There was no better period, in my view, then the 1950s for exploiting this idea and, although I have no wish to return to that time for patterns today, I do think that paying a visit will produce some interesting and stylish designs that to many people will appear new.

The other nice thing is that they very much fall into the category of Belle Epoque 2 that I have been developing and so there will follow, hopefully, a short period of 1950s inspired patterns. I hope these will be suitable as fashion patterns and also for soft furnishings and wall coverings within the home.

To begin, this design looks very much like the 1950s in both the shapes used for the motif and the colouring. I saw it primarily as a fashion fabric and I may well put it with the styles that I intend to use with Redbubble to produce both fashion and homewares goods.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Flowered 1950s Wallcovering

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowered 1950s Wallcovering

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowered 1950s Wallcovering Swatch

For the majority of people in the UK, the mid-century 1950s decade passed pleasantly enough; wages were rising, employment was readily available and slowly the country was getting back to normal.

So far as interior design was concerned, tastes tended to be less than adventurous with most modern people happy to create rooms that were clean, airy and had a light, uncluttered look. Some very creative and inspiring wallpaper was being designed, but for the most part homeowners were being conservative. The wallpaper shown here is, I think, typical of the type of paper that was being purchased during at least the later years of that decade.

My notes tell me that the background is lovely buttermilk while the motif is red with a chocolate stroke. These, of course, are very mid-century colours from the British Standard in use at the time.

The effect on the room is to create something rather bland and easy-on-the-eye but I think it was the sort of look that people wanted. All over the United Kingdom modern, well-constructed homes were being built that offered clean lines and open space and this decoration suited those rooms perfectly. Against the drab backdrop of war, which was still not far from people’s minds, this must have seemed the best way to create and enjoy the new decade.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Three Decades

Mid-century inspired pattern

Three Decades – the 1950s

Mid-century inspired pattern

Three Decades – 1960s and 1970s

Just a pattern today as this is both a mid-century design process and also an ongoing development process and hopefully there will be some similar further patterns that will appear here in the future.

Since I am presently looking at the 1950s mid-century period, the principal image above is a pattern designed for that period and intended primarily as a fabric design. However, it might be possible for it to be used as wallpaper if you accept that it is quite dark.

The exciting part is that I have also produced this as it would have looked a decade later in the 1960s. Here you will see the red background and also, I hope, appreciate the excitement and contrast that was spiralling around in that hectic and innovative period. Not content with that, I have designed it as it could have been created a further decade later in the 1970s (or even perhaps as a modern design today).

This was an interesting, and in its own way a very useful project since it did enable me to compare both styles and designs as well as colouring for the different decades and to stretch my mind and my thinking a little.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

1950s Lounge Curtain Fabric

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

1950s Lounge Curtain Fabric

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

1950s Lounge Curtain Fabric Swatch

Developing my 1950s theme and as a companion to the mid-century wallpaper that I showed yesterday and the day before, this is a surface design for a textile shown here as curtaining.

Floral patterns pre-war tended to be quite complex and this complexity began to unravel during the early mid-century period. This followed a general trend in art to make elements much simpler and to strip away any excess ornamentation.

The background to this textile is Atlantic blue while the motif is in either Post-Office red or alternatively canary yellow. The motif is stylised and the design is a simple one without any excess ornamentation and without any extra colouring. The effect is to produce a strong pattern that would have caught the eye of a visitor. In keeping with the trend of the 1950s the room also has a strongly patterned wallpaper. I have moved the camera a little closer to the wall so that the wallpaper is not quite so obvious.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Again 1950s Lounge Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

Again 1950s Lounge Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired 3D texture

Again 1950s Lounge Wallpaper Swatch

This is another 1950s living room wallpaper which is, in its way, quite different from the pattern that I posted yesterday and yet it, too, represents the best of that decade.

This is based on the sort of floral patterns that were appearing early in the 1950s and which were based themselves on patterns that had appeared before the war. I have a hatred of floral patterns which is a purely personal thing and for that reason I tend not to produce many but it would be wrong not to show that they were used, and used in quantity.

The overall effect of floral patterns, in my opinion, is to appear as background and that is exactly what this pattern, to me at least, seems to do. However, it is a pleasant effect and a wallpaper that even today I would be able to live with.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this along with a colour variation which is well worth seeing and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.