Pattern Aff373

A mi-century inspired surface pattern

This is a fascinating pattern that takes for its inspiration designs from the late 1960s in the United Kingdom and which uses, for me, an unusual colouring.

The purpose of this design was to use for soft furnishings, in particular curtains. The effect that I was trying to capture was a clean and slightly rich look which would work well with most other types of mid-century decoration.

In the event, having finished the design, I realised that it was perhaps more suited to red or brown colouring such as is normal mid-century but I still think that this will make good curtains for the right type of room. I have this in my list of things to do and hopefully I should be able to show a 3D interior visualisation in the coming days ahead.

If you wish, you canalso see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs andpatterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Pattern Aff372

Surface pattern

This is an unusual pattern which was inspired by 1950s patterns but, with the colouring and the shaping, the result is to produce something that looks, on the one hand quite modern, and on the other hand as though it dates back towards the art deco and art nouveau movements in the early 1900s.

The intention was to create a fabric pattern that could be used for soft furnishings – I had in mind curtain material for a mid-century room, perhaps one set in the 1950s decade. The result, however, is something which looks more relevant to the early years of this current century and I was minded to forget the design. However, on further thought, I did feel that there was a place for this design as perhaps a 1960s curtain material, particularly for a room quite late in that decade.

The design was created with Affinity Designer and the colouring used is my normal mid-century extended palette of colours.

If you wish, you canalso see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs andpatterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Pattern Aff371

1960s psychedelic pattern in pink, red and greenI don’t often do psychedelic patterns which is not because I dislike them, quite the contrary, but I make patterns for a purpose (usually) and that purpose is to act as a texture for a three-dimensional object in an architectural visualisation.

Psychedelic patterns tend to be limited to the latter half of the 1960s and it is, for no particular reason, an area which I have not often explored. However I’m now looking into the possibility of producing rooms which explore that area and this is the first pattern I have made which I think would be suitable.

The colours are mid-century in their origin and the pattern is designed to be looked at in the relatively small-scale. In the swatch above, the swirls in the pattern do not show particularly well and I am afraid you will have to wait until this pattern is used in a room to see the full effect. But I am very encouraged by the results so far.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1970s London Flat

Part of a London flat designed at would have been in the late 1970sThis is a fashionable apartment or, since I have placed it in London, a fashionable flat, which might have existed towards the latter half of the 1970s.

Property in London was, and still is, expensive and this is a large living area and so the flat would be a relatively upmarket one, perhaps in a nice area of the city. The furnishings I have tried to make relevant to the period and to the sort of ideas there were in vogue at that time.

The design of the suite is one that I remember seeing at the time and which impressed me, although it would be difficult to find a similar one today. It comes with a three-seat and a two-seat sofa, a chair and a matching coffee table. You will see that, in common with today, one of the occupants has removed their shoes and kicked them under the table!

The small pictures either side of curtains are reminiscent of the sort of images that were appearing at that time and owe much to the work of the American artist Andy Warhol. Pictures, as a way of decoration, were beginning to appear in quantity and were often grouped in a simple way. This is particularly true where, as in this case, the images all share a common theme.

The layout of the room, with the arrangement of the sofas facing the television, is very reminiscent of the way that rooms are constructed today and follows the grouping of furniture that took place in the 1960s. A decade earlier and the furnishings would have been laid out very differently during the 1950s when television was only beginning and most people, at least in Britain, listened to the radio.

The carpet on the floor deadens the sounds and provides insulation as well as making the room look and feel cosy. The curtains have a bold print which would not look out of place today. Something else which has not changed much are the lights, both the ceiling and the stand-alone spotlights. There is a mains powered radio on the bookcase on the left and that, too, would not look out of place today.

The image above is a very small one and only part of the room, the whole can be seen much clearer on my Flickr page, a link to which is provided in the next paragraph.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Pattern Aff369

Late 1960s British patternThis pattern is a 1960s mid-century design that tries to emulate the sort of patterns and experimentation that was going on in the latter half of the 1960s in the United Kingdom. It was this part of the decade that generated so much innovation and unusual ideas and which is responsible for producing so much of what we now think of as British mid-century.

This pattern is shown here as a swatch and was created by me as a design for soft furnishings with a view to using it on both curtains and cushions. Against the, perhaps more run-of-the-mill soft furnishings designs that were available at that time, this pattern is intended for a very modern and up-to-the-minute room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Green Executive 1960s Room

Image created from a 3D model of a 1960s style roomThis is something of a departure for me and an interesting project to work on. The room is from the early 1960s and is designed as a large living room in an executive style house somewhere in the United Kingdom.

As you can see, the room is a large one with a dining annex which is set at one end. This is an interesting configuration although perhaps not the most practical one since food has to be carried through the seating area from the kitchen.

The furnishings are the sort of furnishings that would have been found in a property of this description in the early 1960s and feature a small statue on the occasional table, pictures printed onto canvas rather than within frames and, of course, the excellent lights that were appearing at that time. It is interesting that two of these items, the lights and the statue, seem to have disappeared from modern living areas.

The carpet has already been featured on this blog and needs little further comment other than to say that I am pleased with the result. The wallcovering is a simple one that reflects the period but which is in a colour that is a little unusual although, I think, very effective at creating a cool, smart room.

Sitting looking at the image ready to post and feeling somewhat nostalgic, I have to say that, were it possible, I would very much like to be able to walk into and continue living in it. (In the early 1960s, of course!)

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Carpet From The 1960s

Two mid-century style carpet texturesI know I have said this before but I began producing patterns by making textures to wrap around 3D objects that I had created for interior views of rooms. The reason being that there were, at that time and it was a few years ago, very few textures for wallpapers, soft furnishings and other areas of a mid-century room that used patterns.

I am about to start on a room from the beginning of the 1960s (which is much more familiar territory) and in preparation I am trying to create more realistic looking carpet. The image above represents my first attempts using Filter Forge and the excellent Ruggestry filter created by DreamWarrior. The colours used are sampled from carpet designs of the 1960s decade.

I have used this filter before but this time I wanted to try combining it with the effects in Photo Paint by Corel to see if I could create a more realistic material. The results are above and, although not as good as I would like, they are much better than I have used before.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.