Aff517 Wallpaper

A busy, busy Belle Epoque 2 pattern as wallpaper – sounds good but does it work? Above is my rather upmarket English country house set which has been given this Belle Epoque 2 design as a wallcovering. Although it is not obvious from the set, this design would probably cover all the walls.

Although seemingly a feature wallpaper and, certainly, in a modern room such as a high-class apartment, it would be just confined to one small wall, in a setting such as this I feel that it is permissible to use it as a wallcovering on all of the walls.

The other advantage is that the colours are mid-century and they also have that strong mid-century look which I hope gives the room that classic English elegant aspect. Would I have it in my room? Yes, certainly, if I had a room like this I would.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff512 Wallpaper

My first thought was that I should use this as soft furnishing and I therefore tried it as a curtain material where it was moderately successful. However, trying it as wallpaper produced a far better effect as you can see above.

As I have already said, abstract designs are a departure for me and, having given the matter some thought, I am not sure if it is a path that I want to actively pursue. I feel much more at home with geometric style patterns, the sort of patterns that you are accustomed to seeing from me.

However, this pattern does give the room, it is an upmarket apartment, a different and quite exciting look which I was very pleased to see once the image had been produced by my software.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff510 Wallpaper

This is the wallpaper design from yesterday applied to the walls of a large and moderately luxurious dining room in what would be a British house.

The pattern uses a small-scale and from the angle of the camera, the walls running away from the viewer streak the pattern quite noticeably. However, for a visitor to the room this would not be noticeable as the visitor looks around.

Rather than plain walls, these walls are decorated but not so much as to catch the visitors eye but, rather, to appear just decorated. The pattern does, of course, relieve the boredom and blankness of a completely plain wall.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff509 Wallpaper

I like curtains to be quite bold and dramatic and to form a statement for a room, often being the focus of attention for the visitor as they enter. However, this is not the only way to design a curtain material.

This pattern is a much more gentle pattern and is designed to create in the image two slightly different looks. From a distance, and this is how I saw the pattern, the effect is of a very simple design against a plain background. Looking closer, however, you can see that there is a contrast colour in the dots which, when you look at the swatch, is quite apparent.

The colour is pleasant, restful and muted and the motif is a simple one that is designed to be easy on the eye. The whole purpose of the design is to create a curtain material which is interesting yet not one which will overburden the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff508 Wallpaper

I’m pleased to say that my whimsical pattern worked well as a wallpaper without the need to change the background and it produced just the effect that I think I was looking for.

The set is a living room set that I have used before which shows the wallpaper used on two adjoining walls with the opposite wall, the window and door wall, finished just in plain paint. The pattern is shown at a very small scale which, as I suggested in the previous post, gives the wall a granular look and, I think, an interesting look without it being too bold or too overpowering.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff507 Wallpaper

The whole point of Belle Epoque 2 is to create a form of decoration to add to elements within a house such as wall coverings, fabric or soft furnishings. I am slowly being able to see more clearly the way forward and this pattern for a wallpaper I think shows where I am at this moment.

The origins of the motifs and the colouring date back to mid-century Britain and in particular to the patterns produced in the 1950s by the wealth of talent that was appearing following the end of the Second World War. The motifs are small, as is the scale, and the repeat is a fast one giving the look of overall pattern and with the lines of motif helping delineate the dimensions of the room.

You could say that this pattern gives the room a mid-century modern look but you can also say, I feel, that it also gives the room a soft and pleasant modern feel.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff502 As Wallpaper

This is a very simple and straightforward pattern and so it seemed pointless producing a separate swatch when you can easily see the elements of the design.

This is, of course, mid-century influenced, taking its cue from the 1970s in the United Kingdom and using colours taken from the colours that would have been available at that time.

The room is my old wallpaper set which is probably one of the first sets that I ever created. Here, the wall covering looks pleasant and unremarkable and is intended for use on just one wall. The idea is simply to create a little interest and to provide some decoration to what would otherwise be a dull and uninspiring interior wall. This does, of course, fulfil some of my expectations for Belle Epoque 2.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.