Aff467 Curtains

Following on from the post this morning, I tried to use my mannequin set to create a fashion image but unfortunately I was unable to produce a realistic looking design from the mockup and so I had to reconsider what I was to do with this design.

As well as fashion, I realised that it would be suitable as a fabric pattern and the most obvious and demonstrative use would be as curtain material. I therefore had a look at the sets that I had available and decided that a traditional British drawing room set would be the most appropriate. The illustration that you see above is the use of the pattern as curtain material in a very upmarket drawing room where I think it looks nice.

Having looked at the image several times I am now convinced that it makes a better curtain material design than it would have a fashion pattern.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff466 Wallpaper

Bearing in mind what I have already said about this design’s origin, you would perhaps expect me to use a mid-century modern type room or even a mid-century interior in order to display the paper. In fact I did try this and it looked extremely good but, as I perhaps anticipated, it looks even better in a modern setting.

This set is designed to represent an upmarket apartment and here the wallpaper is used on one wall with the wall containing the windows and curtaining in a solid colour. If this were being used for real, the wallpaper would be used on two of the walls with the remaining two walls being plain. In fact, the curtains take up a good part of the left-hand wall.

The scale is the right sort of size to show off the motifs but without making them too much of a feature. One annoyance which I could not see when I first produced the image but which I think I can see now is that the pattern does create a line of motifs running across the wall. This is something that I, and most other designers, try to avoid like the plague but now that I have seen it, and it is only slight, it is difficult not to see it in the pattern.

I think that this wallcovering gives a pleasant, open and very friendly look to the room and I am pleased with the result.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff449 Pattern

I intended to use this pattern as wallpaper, and it was part of the wallpaper sequence that I have been showing over the last few posts. Having arrived at the final image I began to wonder whether I could use this as fabric instead of wallpaper.

Experimentation soon showed me that this was not really a suitable pattern to use as fabric and so, I am afraid, it will be yet another wallcovering. This does illustrate that making patterns for paper and patterns for fabric are really two quite different things.

This motif is a simple mid-century flower pattern and the colours, although numerous, are all from the mid-century colours in use at the time.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff448 Wallpaper Idea

One of the big advantages of using 3D models in order to show how a pattern would look when actually used on a product is that you can see immediately where you need to make changes.

This design went well as wallpaper but it looked very lonely with so much separation between the motifs. That is, it looked good, I thought, as a pattern but once I had used it as a texture on the walls in this room it became obvious that it did not look the way that I wanted.

I amended the pattern by adding in some simple mid-century style lines in order to fill out the pattern and make it look a little more unified on the wall. I also changed the background colour to Yaffle Green (yaffle is the old name in the UK for a woodpecker), a mid-century colour from the British Standard in use at the time.

Having now produced the final image, I am now happy that the wallcovering looks the way that I wanted which is a mid-century, 1950s look but brought completely up-to-date and suitable for a modern room today.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff447 Bedroom Wallpaper

Following on from yesterday’s post, I have used this pattern to create a texture for a wallpaper which I am using to cover one wall, or possibly two walls, of the bedroom set which I have used before.

The effect that I am trying to create is one of cosiness and warmth, qualities which are important, I believe, in a bedroom. As I said before, the wallpaper is used at a small scale in order to produce an intimate and very ‘patterned’ effect which I think gives a feeling of cosiness. To use this wallpaper on all the walls might be a little too much and could have the effect of making the room appear smaller and so I have used a plain colour on the wall by the window. So far as the walls that you are unable to see, I would suppose that one other wall would be plain and one of the walls would be patterned if they are not all plain. A lot would depend on the other décor within the bedroom and the effect that was desired.

The colours used give quite an intensive look to the room which is intentional since I wanted to create a wallpaper which would work with stronger colours in order to create something which is both mellow and agreeable and which will help the homeowner to settle down for a restful night’s sleep.

This pattern also ticks all my boxes, I believe, as being a Belle Epoque 2 design since it has a small scale, fast repeat and it is both decorative and functional.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff446 Pattern And Wallpaper

In this pattern I have tried to create a design which could have come from the 1950s but which I have tried to make more up to date so that it looks a little more modern and a little less old-fashioned.

Designs like this appeared in the 1950s and, so far as I’m aware, they were completely fresh in that patterns like this had not really appeared before. I think it is also fair to say that, as the decade progressed, designs like this tended to disappear and have only begun to resurface with the interest in mid-century modern.

Many of these patterns were designed as wallpaper and it is for this use that I saw this design. I therefore used my mid-century modern room which has a long wall in order to show how the pattern would look as wallpaper. The swatch shows the background lighter but I wanted to create a warmer look to the wall so I used a slightly darker background colour. The pattern was never intended, I believe, to be used as a very small scale although to show it off to its best it does need a fairly large room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff445 Pattern As Wallpaper

I thought I would spend a little time looking at the use of this pattern as a wallcovering when used at different scales and on different types of wall.

As I suggested in the last post, this is not a design which is intended as a feature wallpaper and I thought that it would be more suitable as a wallpaper used on all of the walls in a room. Whilst I still think this, I rapidly came to the conclusion that as an ‘all over’ wallpaper it was a little too intensive. I therefore tried it as I would use it as a feature wall covering and you can see the result above.

At this scale, the pattern is quite noticeable, perhaps more noticeable than I thought it would be when it was in the design stage (this is often the case). At a smaller scale the pattern begins to look a little odd because the motifs are too close together. At a larger scale the design definitely resembles a feature wallpaper which was not quite the effect that I wanted since feature wallpapers need more impact.

However, looking at the final result, I am pleased with the way that the wallpaper looks and with the effect that it gives to the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.