Another Railway Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Another Railway Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Another Railway Seat Pattern Swatch

The patterning on transport seats has changed a lot over half a century with the motifs and colours becoming much more vivid and exciting which is not to say that mid-century patterns were dull and uninteresting.

This pattern is intended to join both the mid-century liking for the simple repeat with the modern practice of using bolder and more striking colouring. In fact, the colours are taken directly from the mid-century palette – they are midnight blue and brass.

The intention behind this pattern is to create a seating that is both inviting to passengers and which is also stimulating and likely to create an enjoyable experience. The design is perhaps more suited to short journeys rather than long ones and, although shown here on a train, the pattern would be equally suitable for buses or possibly for waterborne use.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Railway Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Railway Seat Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Railway Seat Pattern Swatch

Mid-century trains had some really nice patterning on the seats and a lot of it was made by well-known and influential artists, many of whom went on to become household names in the 1950s and 60s.

The set for this pattern uses a rather nice carriage that I got from Daz 3D and represents the sort of corridor train that would have been a common sight mid-century. The pattern is a strong one, probably too strong to be used as curtaining or as cushions but as a seat in a train it is ideal. The carriages were not particularly well lit and so bright colours could be used along with bold patterns. This pattern uses Post Office red, a mid-century British Standard colour which makes the seats look inviting and interesting for the passengers.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns on my fabulous and ever-growing Flickr page which is here.

Bird Seat Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bird Seat Fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bird Seat Fabric Swatch

This is a pattern intended for bus, train or coach seats where the journey is perhaps a longer one or for whatever reason high contrast patterns are not required.

The motif has mid-century roots and colours although the actual design is very modern. The idea is that the pattern is much more closely coupled to the background and so the overall effect is more restful and so conducive to longer journeys.

This fabric would also be useful in situations where a high contrast or highly coloured finish is not desired or where such a finish is inappropriate.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Green Dotted Seats

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Green Dotted Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Green Dotted Seats Swatch

This is a transportation design which was intended for any type of seat, either multi-seating or individual/double seats, the sort of seating you find in a typical bus, coach or train.

The design has mid-century roots being reminiscent of many of the patterns produced in the early 1950s although the colours and the way that the pattern is executed brings the design very much up-to-date.

I thought that the pattern looks best on a row of seats, and I have therefore used my bus set although this pattern, perhaps at a slightly smaller scale, would look good for the double seats on a bus or the train seating that I also use. To make this point I have included on my Flickr page an image created with this pattern using the train set.

The way that the pattern is put together is designed to separate the seats rather than show them as one complete unit and, hopefully, the design takes the passenger’s eye up and down the seats rather than across. Normally this makes the seats best for single or double although I quite like them as a row.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Circular Route Bus Fabric

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Mid-century inspired pattern

Circular Route Bus Fabric Swatch

The fabrics used in transportation are very interesting to design since they lead us to adopt various constraints in the type of pattern and the colouring that we can use.

Traditionally mid-century fabrics used in buses and trains tended to be quite inconspicuous although, particularly the train designs, the pattern was of very high quality. Of late there has been a tendency to use much more colourful and striking designs, particularly where it is supposed the passenger will only be sitting on the seat for a short time – her example buses on town routes.

This design, however, is intended to have a foot in both camps and to be suitable for short-term bus transport or for longer term bus, coach or train journeys. The design is, on the face of it, quite a strong one although the regular repeat and horizontal flow tend to soften the look. The way the design is viewed, I believe, would make it a more restful design suitable for longer term transport applications, for example the seats on InterCity trains. However, I have tried to maintain a sense of excitement and interest within the pattern and to also make the seat noticeable, pleasing and a design that will lead the passenger to sit on the seat and enjoy their transportation experience.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Leafy Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Leafy Seats

I’ve probably said this before, but I do like doing patterns for commercial vehicle seats such as buses, coaches and ships. I think I know why and its tied in with my love of patterns because there’s something very appealing about looking at a row of seats all of which have the same design.

Once again, I have used my set showing the inside of the bus and for the seats I have used a loose leaf pattern at quite a relaxed scale which I think gives a pleasing and harmonious look to the row. The pattern is designed to show each seat individually since that is what travellers boarding a bus will look for first and for that reason the sense is ‘up and down’ but the pattern also takes the eye along the seats.

Buses, for the most part, are short duration transport allowing patterns to be quite obtrusive although I have designed this pattern to also be suitable for a longer journey. Hopefully, to demonstrate this, I have included on my Flickr page an image of this pattern applied to the train set showing the design on seats which may, perhaps, be used for a longer period. The effect here is to provide a more restful and inviting seat to encourage the passenger to enjoy the journey.

You can, should you wish, also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Following on from yesterday’s post about bus seats, we have a pattern which has some similarities and which is designed for similar modes of transport. In this particular case, however, it is shown as the pattern on the seats in a train.

Once again the pattern is shown at a fairly small-scale although in this particular case it does not have a strong horizontal element, the pattern being more or less equally divided. This, I think, lends itself well to double seating and I rather like the look of it in seats which face.

Once again the pattern is a colourful one with small shapes designed to enliven and amuse the traveller and so this is, of course, intended primarily for use where the journey time will be relatively short. In my opinion, longer journeys of an hour or greater should really use seats which are more relaxing. I will show suitable ‘long-range’ patterns at a later date.

The train was modelled in Cinema 4D with all of the modelling produced by me and I have, of course, produced all of the textures used.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.