Aff540 As Sofa Material

I have to admit to being a little, or maybe a lot, conservative in my choice of upholstery fabric which reflects the type of material that was available and was used mid-century to cover sofas and chairs. This does not reflect the modern ideas of using much bolder and much more colourful material for soft furnishing which is why I decided to use the Belle Epoque 2 designs as sofa fabric.

Although I created the design with the intention of using the pattern at a small scale, perhaps smaller than that shown on the swatch which I posted yesterday, I have now had to have a change of heart. At a small scale this pattern looks bitty and quite out of place as a sofa fabric pattern. But at a larger scale the sofa becomes alive and it begins to look larger and much more comfortable than it did before.

To be honest, I am not completely sure that I like a fabric this light on a sofa and I do not think that I would be the first to rush out and buy one. However this is the sort of look that I see in interior magazines that I view each month so maybe it is right. Maybe you will like this, maybe you are more modern than am I.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff533 As Cushion Material

As I said when I introduced this design, the pattern is based on my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 and I saw this as either curtain fabric or alternatively as a covering for cushions. Having tried both, I realised that the smaller scale of Belle Epoque 2 made the material much better to use as a cushion cover.

The overall effect and the colouring, which is based on mid-century hues, is intended to give the cushions a rich and elaborate look while at the same time making them suitable and adaptable for the modern home.

Over the last few years, modern fashion has seen the use of large-scale patterns for cushions and for other similar household soft furnishings. This is, of course, a trend which I have adopted myself in my own soft furnishing designs but since I began looking at the possibilities of Belle Epoque 2 patterns I have begun to realise that they make excellent cushions and curtains used at the proper scale.

The effect of a large design on cushions is to catch the eye and make them noticeable. It is my belief that there should, in a home, be some cushions that are like this but the majority should have a less noticeable and less eye-catching pattern. And this seems to be borne out by most modern home furnishing periodicals. For this reason I am hoping to be able to produce more Belle Epoque 2 patterns to use with soft furnishing and also to try and find a way to use them effectively as curtaining.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff531 As Curtain Material

As I suspected, this pattern makes an excellent curtain material if it were made into fabric and used at a slightly larger scale than that shown in the swatch.

For simplicity, I have used the same set although there are some changes to that set which are simply development changes and were not made to show off this fabric but in order to make the room look a little more modern.

The room with plain curtains might look quite uneventful and boring but the addition of these curtains, using a Belle Epoque 2 style pattern, lift the room and give interest as well as a warming, conversational look. The room, as is perhaps obvious, is intended as a living area in an upmarket apartment. It is of course possible to open the curtains much more in order to let light into the room or to close them at night to create a large decorated area to add interest.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff492 Cushions

I do like making patterns for cushions but, of course, to comply with my ideas of Belle Epoque 2 the pattern should be small-scale and with a fast repeat. That criteria fits this pattern perfectly except for one thing.

Having tried that on this cushion I discovered to my surprise that the pattern looked a little lost and out of touch. Yet at a larger scale, filling the whole cushion, it looked so much better, or at least it did for me. I suppose sometimes it works that way.

This set is part of a hotel room set that I created sometime back although now I could equally say that it was a sofa in front of the main window in an apartment building. For those that need to know, the set was created in Cinema 4D and the same program was used for the render.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff467 Curtains

Following on from the post this morning, I tried to use my mannequin set to create a fashion image but unfortunately I was unable to produce a realistic looking design from the mockup and so I had to reconsider what I was to do with this design.

As well as fashion, I realised that it would be suitable as a fabric pattern and the most obvious and demonstrative use would be as curtain material. I therefore had a look at the sets that I had available and decided that a traditional British drawing room set would be the most appropriate. The illustration that you see above is the use of the pattern as curtain material in a very upmarket drawing room where I think it looks nice.

Having looked at the image several times I am now convinced that it makes a better curtain material design than it would have a fashion pattern.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Wallpaper

I spent a little time this afternoon using this pattern as a three-dimensional texture to use for curtains to give a better idea of the concept that I had and how the pattern would look applied as curtaining.

I would like to say that this room was modelled on my own study but unfortunately it is part of a set representing a room in a stately home in the United Kingdom. However, I think that the pattern looks nice as curtains and that the effect when the curtains are open is a pleasant one catching the eye of a visitor and helping to maintain the high class finish of the room.

I must admit that the more I look at this pattern the more I am drawn to it and the more I think that it does fit with my developing ideas of a new Belle Epoque and I hope that you like this image.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff431 Curtains

What makes this design special, I believe, is the overall look of red, in order to provide depth and interest, against the warm, not noticeable but very enveloping, magnolia background.

The motif is a simple mid-century design that could have come from the 1970s in the United Kingdom or, indeed, from either of the two previous decades. I have chosen quite a large-scale and you will see from the illustration above that the curtains are quite extensive and intended to be the curtaining that you would find at, for example, a hotel window. Having said this, however, I believe that these curtains would look equally effective and decorative put up at any window in a normal house.

The colours, as I mentioned above, are mid-century ones from the British Standard in use at the time and are poppy red, contrasted against magnolia. Within the design, as you can perhaps see on the swatch above, there is also the lovely mid-century marine blue.

Thinking about the idea of decoration within the home and creating a look which a visitor would find both interesting and appealing, I think that this material used as curtains would go a long way and so I have tagged it as Belle Epoque2.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.