Aff401

This is a 1970s style pattern although, it has to be said, it is a rather restrained one and was intended for the soft furnishings in a room of that period.

The motif is a cut-down version of a motif that I often use for 1970s patterns and I experimented with the colouring to make the design less busy and less colourful than perhaps I normally would have done for that period. This was a little experimental but the result, I am pleased to say, is quite satisfying since, as curtaining, the design looks cool and rather sophisticated in a room intended to be from that decade.

I also had in mind using this design for cushions although I soon realised that the pattern needed a little more life and colour variation for that purpose.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Wheels Of Colour

Redbubble Products Made With This Design

This design is rather an amalgamation of different motifs that have been put together to resemble the tile patterns that were produced in the UK mid-century.

I have taken some liberties with the colours and, although the colouring is still firmly mid-century, it is much brighter and more extreme than you perhaps might have found that time. The colours, as you may have guessed, are from my extended mid-century palette.

The intention with this particular pattern was to produce a very colourful design for both clothing and homeware products such as cushions. I have included an image which shows four of this range made with Redbubble where I hope that you will agree that they produce good-looking and pleasant patterned final products. For the want of a better name I decided to title them as shown above.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Blue And Gold Hats

This was a fun pattern to make and the result, once I had produced the image, came over as really stunning. This is the result, primarily, of using a fast repeat with a background which is quite dark and distinctive.

The idea for the design came from late 1960s mid-century patterns although the motif itself is one that I created some time back for a different purpose. However, by using this as a fast repeat and by choosing gold against a blue background I achieved a quite eye-catching result.

As you know, I always have a purpose in mind when I create patterns and the idea for this design was that it should be used as either a fashion fabric or a fabric for soft furnishings. I had in mind, to be honest, it’s use as curtaining although I am not sure yet the type of room in which it could sensibly be used.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Green Frog Pattern

This pattern was designed to follow the ideas and motifs that appeared towards the second half of the 1960s and led towards the somewhat chaotic but interesting patterns of the very late 1960s and early 1970s.

At that time there was exerted a lot of influence from the early years of the 1900s and in particular the art deco and art nouveau periods. Of course, a lot of this work was in the minds and in the education of the many talented and prolific artists that appeared to create patterns during those heady years of the mid-century decades in the United Kingdom.

The colouring is a simple mid-century green with magnolia used for the stroke. In fact, I did experiment with colours and there exist several variations of this, including red and blue, both of which form very acceptable patterns.

This sort of design, I feel, is suitable for household soft furnishing fabric and so would find a home with cushions and also with the fabric for curtains.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Brown Handles

This was an easy pattern to do in many ways, not because of the absence of any technical difficulty but because of the way that the colours went so well together.

The actual pattern is a simple one of stylised mid-century motifs placed on a plain coffee type background. What I wanted to do was to create a 1930s style fashion look but bring it into the 1950s using best placement of the three colours used for the motifs. The idea was to make the finished design, when used as a large area of fabric, show a distinct and noticeable pattern.

The colours are straight from the mid-century palette giving a relaxed and open look that is easy on the eye. Intended as a fashion pattern, this would be equally at home when used for curtains or other soft furnishings.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Solstice Squares

Today is the winter solstice 2018 and I happened to be looking for a suitable catchy name for this pattern which is actually called aff391 in my inventory and Solstice Squares seemed appropriate.

The design uses mid-century inspired motifs which are from my collection of small motifs that I use from time to time. I was experimenting with the placement of motifs in order to form a repeated pattern but using the motifs to actually make a shape to be repeated. The simplest shape to make is either a square or a circle and the particular shape used resembles either one or the other. The pattern, as you can see, is a simple one. However simple patterns are often the best ones to look at and are certainly the easiest ones to use as a fabric for making curtains, cushions or similar soft furnishings.

The background is a neutral grey to remind me that I could experiment with backgrounds in order to produce a series of designs for fabric and this is something that I will probably do in the months ahead in 2019.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Early Flowers

This is called ‘Early Flowers’ because it is based on the type of flower motif that was used early in the mid-century decades and had been used ever since the beginning of the 20th century.

Here the motif is used, as it was probably originally intended, as a wallpaper or possibly as a fabric for curtains. I like fairly quick repeats and I also like to see the way that a pattern looks when it is composed of just one motif. As a wallpaper, this will not catch the eye but will look interesting and decorative on either a feature wall or perhaps two or three walls in a room.

In order to make the pattern look more solid, I have squeezed up the repeats so that, from a distance, the design looks pixelated. The effect of this is to make the dimensions of the room look less obvious and to try and create a softer feel to the walls. Used as a curtain material the effect would be a similar one.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.