Another Mid-Century Style Dining Chair Fabric

Another Mid-Century Style Dining Chair Fabric

I like designing patterns for chairs because it gives me a chance to think carefully about the use of the pattern that I am creating and about how it will look from the various angles that the chair is seen within the confines of a room.

Although I considered and evaluated the pattern I have used here on several different chairs, I have chosen the simple glass table and chrome chairs that I used before in order to bring this image to you. The pattern is inspired by designs from the 1950s used in the United Kingdom and is intended to be bright and cheerful and at the same time I have tried to make the pattern look as modern as I can. In order to facilitate this, I have changed the wallpaper from that used before to a design which is a little more modern although still based on mid-century ideas.

The colours used on the chair design are from my extended, mid-century palette and are designed to make the chairs themselves look very obvious within the room and, in this particular case, that helps to show them off in what is a slightly darker dining area.

I have also included a little piece of the wallpaper design along with the pattern used for the chairs.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Mid-Century Style Dining Chair Fabric

Looking through a late 1970s catalogue recently, I saw a glass topped table and chrome matching chairs that were exactly the sort of table that I had back in those far off days. Curious as to the fate of glass topped tables, I decided to have a look to see if I could buy one today and I was heartened to find that tables very similar to this were for sale and appeared to be quite popular.

I therefore decided to build one and to create a pattern for the seat cover that I thought would echo the late 1970s but which would also be a suitable pattern for use today. Obviously the design is similar to patterns created during that period and also the colours used are from my extended mid-century palette which gives the seating a noticeable and, I think, very modern look.

Where this table for sale today then I think I would be interested in having this in my own dining room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1970s sofa chair fabric pattern

I created a new pattern for the fabric shown on the 1970s sofa and chair and this pattern is displayed in the images above in a little more detail.

The 1970s period was full of innovation in patterns, much of which reflected the forward-looking artwork of the day. However, in my view, the patterning on furniture remained less innovative and drew more on classic, mid-century styling. For that reason, I created a pattern which is a simple, mid-century floral.

Have I make the pattern larger, and perhaps bolder than would have been appropriate in the early 1970s? Perhaps I have because I also had an eye to making this product look more appealing to a modern-day audience. Does that mean that it would have been less interesting if it were being offered for sale at that time? In my view, purchasers would be just as excited by the look created by the pattern and the way it emphasises the dimensions of the sofa and the chair. However, perhaps you might say that I would say that wouldn’t I!

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Floral Wallpaper Aff600

The mid-century years in the UK generated some exciting patterns that were both new and very different to the patterns that had gone before. This was largely due to the emerging pool of young talent would go on to change the way patterns are produced for the next several decades. However, it would be wrong to think that this was a time of great general change because the patterns that had been developed from the previous decades were still there and still very much in demand.

This design is a simple floral wallpaper pattern which would still have been popular mid-century and for many householders it was the type of pattern that they would have preferred on their walls.

The design is, I suppose, mid-century but equally looks back to turn-of-the-century ideas although the colouring places it very much in the United Kingdom in the 1950s or 1960s. I have to be honest, I never was a great fan of floral design although, to be fair, I have enjoyed creating this and in order to balance my output of work I will try and create some similar designs in the future.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Sur La Beach en bleu

The last room was quite personal and various people suggested that perhaps I should, as I normally would, simply choose a theme for the room and redo it again. Blue is a colour that I like and which, for no particular reason, I tend not to use to any great extent so I thought I would create a blue room and see if my use of patterns found more favour.

The wallpaper and the sofa fabric are both Belle Epoque 2 patterns and, whilst the sofa fabric is designed to be very regular, the wallpaper was created with a slight jink in the pattern which takes the eye and relieves the monotony. Both the curtains and the carpet are variations of old patterns that I have done before and serve to provide pleasing decorative features to the room.

In this design the walls and carpet are light while the sofa and curtains are dark and the furniture in the room is painted white. An interesting alternative is to colour the furniture, perhaps a midnight blue to match the sofa, although this does create a rather sombre look to the room.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff542 Pattern

I suppose I need hardly comment that this is a Belle Epoque 2 pattern intended for wrapping paper and is designed to have a bold and directional look.

The motives are simply taken from my collection of mid-century motifs and bear a resemblance to those that could have been used in the 1950s. The colouring, too, is taken from my extended British palette that would have been in use during the mid-century years in the United Kingdom.

I intend to turn this into wrapping paper and my initial thoughts are that, with its directional properties, it would make an excellent paper from which to construct gift bags.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff541 Pattern

This design has all the elements of Belle Epoque 2 from the way that it is constructed although, it has to be said, it is different from most of the other patterns in this series that I have posted so far. The design is constructed to allow for the motif to flow from one to another and so, to an extent, this destroys the idea of the fast repeat since this becomes much less obvious.

However, having said that, it still does have most of the elements that make Belle Epoque 2 looks so good. With the good looks, it was designed for use as an interior soft furnishing design although it is possible that I may decide to use it as a carpet texture because I have a feeling that it would excel in this role.

The design is constructed using basic elements that look, on the face of it, quite mid-century while the colouring, too, is from the same period. At the scale shown, the pattern looks quite together although at a smaller scale it does begin to look more like a Belle Epoque 2 design as the repeat becomes more obvious.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.