Aff532 As Curtain Material

Curtain patterns are very much a matter of personal taste although the colours are usually dictated by the colours, textures and design of the room in which they are intended to be used. This design was always intended to be used as curtain fabric and the image above shows how it would look if it were made into curtain material.

The effect is to produce something simple and decorative without it being eye-catching and it is certainly not intended to dominate the room in which it is used. The flowers are simple but effective and although not noticed immediately upon entering the room the eye soon picks up the design and the colours – such as they are.

The room set is intended to be a simple living room in a modern house or apartment. The curtains are drawn although it is daylight outside and the lighting within the room is not shown as artificial in order not to distort the colours.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

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Aff523 As Pattern

We are on a roll! Having created and managed to use a design as wrapping paper I thought that the next design should be similar. Perhaps with a different colour as the background it could be used also as a design on a product case, for example a perfume case.

The pattern, a Belle Epoque 2 design, is a simple triangle pattern which maybe has its roots in mid-century designs produced in the 1950s. The colours are taken from my extended palette which contains colours from that period.

I already have, as you have seen, sets which give me a gift bag or a parcel but I want to experiment using this design as the texture for a product box and you will see later whether I am successful in this.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Aff519 As Wallpaper

Bearing in mind all that I had said, I wondered whether this particular pattern, posted yesterday, would make a good wallpaper design for a modern room. But I need not have worried, as you can see from the image above, it makes a wallpaper that makes the room.

At this scale which, incidentally, is just a little larger than I had envisaged, the wallcovering looks both sophisticated and distinctive giving the room a look which is both modern and yet decorated. The light colour of the background to the wallpaper also allows me to experiment with a bolder colour on the wall by the window using, incidentally, a colour taken from the flower in the wallpaper.

You could go further and create accents with the cushions and also echo the red colour throughout the room. The regular nature of the repeat, designed to embody the ideas of Belle Epoque 2, would try to make the wall look wide and tall and let it stand out against the bolder colours of the wall either side if it was decided to use this as a feature wallpaper. Used all over, the effect would be, I imagine, to make the room seem larger and to emphasise the dimensions.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look

Aff516 Furnishing Fabric

I had intended, as I explained in the last post, to use this design as a furnishing fabric or alternatively as a fabric that might be suitable for curtains or cushions.

In this particular colour, the design is a little unsuited to curtains or cushions, but it does make, I believe, an excellent furnishing fabric. Obviously, the look of the design varies according to the furniture on which it is used but in this case I have teamed it with a sofa with wooden arms which go nicely with the dark colour.

This is not intended as a reproduction fabric or indeed as a fabric intended for a mid-century modern room but as a modern fabric. However, having said this, it would look equally good on a sofa or similar piece of furniture in a mid-century period room.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff516 Pattern

This is a modern pattern, intended as a furniture pattern, but one which has a very mid-century origin although that origin is not immediately apparent.

Motifs such as this, which are basically geometric motifs, were quite common in the 1950s in the United Kingdom and here I have used them in square confines in order to produce an overall design. The colouring is taken from my extended mid-century palette and uses the sort of colour that might have been used on mid-century furniture.

These days, furnishings have a variety of patterns and colours, many of which are much bolder. However, there is still a place, I feel, for more traditional colours and patterns and I will experiment using this as a texture on perhaps a sofa and see the result

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff514 Pattern

This is a Belle Epoque 2 type pattern that has what I call a two-tone effect built in so that the overall look of the design catches the eye because it seems at first look to be unusual.

This design falls into my category of Belle Epoque 2 because it is of a relatively small-scale and it also has a fast repeat. During creation, I saw this pattern as being suitable for wallpaper or as an alternative for the standard soft furnishings and I shall spend a little time trying various alternatives to see which works best.

The inspiration for the design comes from both the motifs of the 1960s as they were used in the United Kingdom along with the overall look that wallpapers had during the 1970s. The colouring is taken from my extended mid-century palette.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.