Aff533 As Cushion Material

As I said when I introduced this design, the pattern is based on my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 and I saw this as either curtain fabric or alternatively as a covering for cushions. Having tried both, I realised that the smaller scale of Belle Epoque 2 made the material much better to use as a cushion cover.

The overall effect and the colouring, which is based on mid-century hues, is intended to give the cushions a rich and elaborate look while at the same time making them suitable and adaptable for the modern home.

Over the last few years, modern fashion has seen the use of large-scale patterns for cushions and for other similar household soft furnishings. This is, of course, a trend which I have adopted myself in my own soft furnishing designs but since I began looking at the possibilities of Belle Epoque 2 patterns I have begun to realise that they make excellent cushions and curtains used at the proper scale.

The effect of a large design on cushions is to catch the eye and make them noticeable. It is my belief that there should, in a home, be some cushions that are like this but the majority should have a less noticeable and less eye-catching pattern. And this seems to be borne out by most modern home furnishing periodicals. For this reason I am hoping to be able to produce more Belle Epoque 2 patterns to use with soft furnishing and also to try and find a way to use them effectively as curtaining.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 Curtains

I decided to see how this 1950s pattern could best be used, the pattern is a busy one and the colour and overall look are quite strong and so the obvious choice would be fashion or soft furnishings. I have never been able to produce realistic looking fashion mockups and so I endeavoured to create a curtain fabric.

The rooms that I usually use did not seem to take the pattern particularly well but I have found a room which began life as a mid-century inspired room and the pattern used here as curtains produced a very acceptable result.

I have shown the curtains as they appear open during daylight since I think that this gives the best idea of the pattern and the colouring. At night when the curtains are pulled the pattern is stronger, and a lot bolder and this adds to the excitement within the room making the window space very much a feature.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff438 Wallpaper

Following on as I said from this morning’s post, this is the 1950s style design that I created earlier now transformed into a wallcovering. It is, I suppose, a feature wall although it is not a design that catches the visitor’s eye nor is it intended to be something that transforms the room.

Rather, this is a pleasant wallpaper that gives a colour and a warmth to the room and which prevents the walls from looking dull and uninteresting.

This room is the living area of a large and well-appointed apartment and the wallpaper is intended to give the room a modern, stylish yet traditional look and feel.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff435 Feature Wallpaper

As I said I would, I spent a little time creating a new 3D file using this particular image as a wallcovering for a feature wall. After some thought, I decided to use the modern dining room with the nice bifold doors leading out onto the garden.

The purpose of this wallpaper is to provide a feature for the visitor as they enter the room. Obviously you cannot see the entire room but you have to imagine that the door is in the right hand wall positioned somewhere in front of the seating area. The whole scene has two sofas facing one another with an occasional table in between.

I have used a slightly bigger scale than that shown in the swatch in the last post because that seemed to suit the space better and to make the wall look more obvious and decorated. Using a smaller scale had a similar effect but here the wall looked more uniformly coloured, an idea that I was anxious to avoid. Thinking about the look of the room I was pleased with the result and, were this my living and dining area, I would be happy with the colours and the look that has been created.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1970s London Flat

Part of a London flat designed at would have been in the late 1970sThis is a fashionable apartment or, since I have placed it in London, a fashionable flat, which might have existed towards the latter half of the 1970s.

Property in London was, and still is, expensive and this is a large living area and so the flat would be a relatively upmarket one, perhaps in a nice area of the city. The furnishings I have tried to make relevant to the period and to the sort of ideas there were in vogue at that time.

The design of the suite is one that I remember seeing at the time and which impressed me, although it would be difficult to find a similar one today. It comes with a three-seat and a two-seat sofa, a chair and a matching coffee table. You will see that, in common with today, one of the occupants has removed their shoes and kicked them under the table!

The small pictures either side of curtains are reminiscent of the sort of images that were appearing at that time and owe much to the work of the American artist Andy Warhol. Pictures, as a way of decoration, were beginning to appear in quantity and were often grouped in a simple way. This is particularly true where, as in this case, the images all share a common theme.

The layout of the room, with the arrangement of the sofas facing the television, is very reminiscent of the way that rooms are constructed today and follows the grouping of furniture that took place in the 1960s. A decade earlier and the furnishings would have been laid out very differently during the 1950s when television was only beginning and most people, at least in Britain, listened to the radio.

The carpet on the floor deadens the sounds and provides insulation as well as making the room look and feel cosy. The curtains have a bold print which would not look out of place today. Something else which has not changed much are the lights, both the ceiling and the stand-alone spotlights. There is a mains powered radio on the bookcase on the left and that, too, would not look out of place today.

The image above is a very small one and only part of the room, the whole can be seen much clearer on my Flickr page, a link to which is provided in the next paragraph.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Green Executive 1960s Room

Image created from a 3D model of a 1960s style roomThis is something of a departure for me and an interesting project to work on. The room is from the early 1960s and is designed as a large living room in an executive style house somewhere in the United Kingdom.

As you can see, the room is a large one with a dining annex which is set at one end. This is an interesting configuration although perhaps not the most practical one since food has to be carried through the seating area from the kitchen.

The furnishings are the sort of furnishings that would have been found in a property of this description in the early 1960s and feature a small statue on the occasional table, pictures printed onto canvas rather than within frames and, of course, the excellent lights that were appearing at that time. It is interesting that two of these items, the lights and the statue, seem to have disappeared from modern living areas.

The carpet has already been featured on this blog and needs little further comment other than to say that I am pleased with the result. The wallcovering is a simple one that reflects the period but which is in a colour that is a little unusual although, I think, very effective at creating a cool, smart room.

Sitting looking at the image ready to post and feeling somewhat nostalgic, I have to say that, were it possible, I would very much like to be able to walk into and continue living in it. (In the early 1960s, of course!)

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1989 Living Room Right Hand View

A living room in 1989 - the third and final image which shows the right hand viewThis is the right hand and final view of the 1989 living room and, for such a large and time-consuming project, this seems to come round quite quickly. One final step to complete the project is to produce a movie of, essentially, the same images but taken as the camera revolves and this is something I will work on this week despite the electrical work which is going on around me and will necessitate turning off the power for one possibly two days.

This scene shows the way in which hi-fi was taking over the living spaces in rooms particularly with the influx of available forms of media. Although this looks cumbersome and probably from a modern perspective, antiquated, this was to lay the foundations for the way in which media is presented today although, of course, none of it was streamed.

Again, since this is a forward-looking family, there are ‘Andy Warhol’ style prints on the walls which provide some colour and interest. One feature to note is that people still tended to have quite a lot of ornamentation on furniture such as wall units. However, this ostentation was beginning to disappear and by the advent of the next decade much of the ornamentation that you see will have gone. In order to prepare for this I have included vases and the like on the unit and the storage on one wall but I have tried to keep other ornamentation to a minimum.

I am Midcentury Styles and so I will not do a room in the next decade which would be very different with wood floors, less patterns and many more solid areas of colour.

This image is much smaller than the final image which I will post in its entirety on Flickr, the link being below.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.