Sophisticated Bedroom Wall

Mid-century inspired pattern

Sophisticated Bedroom Wall

Mid-century inspired pattern

Sophisticated Bedroom Wall Swatch

Although this is mid-century inspired and uses a selection of mid-century colours from the British Standard in use at the time, it could be from more or less any period since quick repeats of small motifs has been a staple for wallpaper in most decades (except, of course, the present one).

To show this wall covering, I have used the bedroom set that I use for mid-century work and I think it creates a very nice ambience in a room designed for restful sleep. The scale, in common with recent ideas that I have been using, could be made smaller but this would lose the rather nice ‘vase’ shape of the motif.

The background is middle brown with a motif that is created using brass and silver and these colours look so nice together, I feel. (I have made a mental note that I must stop using them so much as they seem to crop up in my work with monotonous regularity!)

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Quick Repeat Wall Covering

Mid-century inspired pattern

Quick Repeat Wall Covering

Mid-century inspired pattern

Quick Repeat Wall Covering Swatch

I’ve been in the habit recently of using patterns at quite a big scale so I thought it was time to redress this and make a pattern that is designed to be used small scale with a quick repeat.

This room looks new but it is, in fact, a 3D room I made some years back which I have retextured and (hopefully) made to look like the rooms I create now. It’s an old-fashioned room in an old-fashioned house which resembles a room in a house in which I used to live.

The interior of this room looks quite dark which helps to give it – I feel – more of a proper mid-century look. One nice way of designing wallpaper is to give it a small repeat so that the pattern looks like little dots. This looks nice and it also makes the rooms seem, in some way, more airy and approachable rather than dark and scary. As soon as I created the test image for this room I was surprised at how good it looked and how much like the image I had in my head it seemed.

So far as the colour goes – it’s a sort of rather dark middle brown – it complements the atmosphere I wanted to create well and I have to say that I was rather envious that I can’t create that room where I live today.

If you are interested, according to my notes the colours used are maple, post office red, parakeet, golden brown and fiesta blue.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Low Key Curtains Swatch

This is a pattern which uses perhaps more modern ideas and motifs but with mid-century ideals and colours from the British Standard in use in the 1950s and 60s in the United Kingdom.

The design is the sort of design that might have been available in the 1950s and here I have adapted it as curtain material in a very ordinary mid-century living room. The effect is to make the curtains look clean and uncluttered and in that sense, they look modern. This could be an excellent design if used in a newly created mid-century room.

According to my notes the colour of the background is sky while the colours used in the motif are Paris green, middle brown and montella.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Statement Midcentury Inspired Wallpaper Swatch

Patterns were often used at a small scale for wallpaper to give the walls a more unified look where the individual motif was less important than the total, overall look.

Mid-century designers changed many things, including many of the established rules, and wallpapers began to be seen with larger, more colourful and more prominent motifs. This made the motif, rather than the overall pattern, the most important part of the design as can be seen in many 1960s wall coverings.

But a pattern is a pattern, it is designed to be seen as a repeat motif and the repeat element never totally disappeared. In the 1970s it began, in its turn, to be more prominent along with the larger motifs.

This little bit of history leads us to today’s pattern which is a large motif but where the repeat is just as important to create the overall effect. Here I have used the pattern on one wall of a modern dining area in a large room overlooking a splendid garden. The scale is large but not massive and the repeat makes the wall look impressive while carrying the eye along the width. Only one wall would be used this way since this is too much on all the walls (although in the 1970s all the walls would have been papered).

My notes have the background as moss green and the motif as jonquil, anchusa (blue) and ribbon blue with a chocolate stroke.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Large Pattern 70s Wallpaper

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Large Pattern 70s Wallpaper

Mid-century inspired pattern

Large Pattern 70s Wallpaper Swatch

The 1970s, at least in the United Kingdom, was a good time for patterned wallcoverings and it would seem from research that most people would have hung wallpaper on their walls.

Today that seems odd with so many painted walls but I suppose the idea then was to stay in fashion and take advantage of the many different and exciting patterns that were around. Walls are ideal for decoration and the effect is to brighten up the room and provide interest both for the house owner and for the visitor. This design is not intended to catch the visitor’s eye but merely to look good and provide a canvas that takes the eye along the length of the room accentuating the dimensions.

My notes give the colours as orange for the background, jasmine, orange,
montella and poppy red for the motif while the stroke is chocolate. I do tend to alter colours at the last minute and forget to update the notes but I think that is still right.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Large Print Midcentury Curtains

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Large Print Midcentury Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Large Print Midcentury Curtains

Mid-century styles, far from being boring, where often very inventive and eye-catching, the more so as the decades rolled away.

This, however, is a more restrained UK design that would have been OK if used in the middle of the mid-century, perhaps around the early 1960s..

My notes for this design tell me that the background is midnight blue and the motif colours are Bredon green, mustard and rich cream. The effect of these colours is to make the fabric look pleasing without it being intrusive.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here

Black And Almost White Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Black And Almost White Pattern

Mid-century inspired pattern

Black And Almost White Pattern

Black and white patterns are really almost ageless and, because of the contrast inherent in them, they produce something that is very noticeable and yet also very comforting.

Here the pattern uses the universal scrolls that have been in use for years to produce a simple yet elegant design that is used here as material for curtains in a living area. Overall, and with plain coloured walls, it does give a very nice look to the window area although, and I have to be fair and honest, now that I see the final image it might not be all that genuine mid-century.

Changing emphasis, flushed with success for my new mannequin area I wanted to use this pattern as a fashion fabric but I found that it needed just a little more work before I can do that so I will try to post it a little later.

If you would like to see larger versions of these designs and my other work then you can do so on my Flickr page, a link to which is here