Aff540 As Sofa Material

I have to admit to being a little, or maybe a lot, conservative in my choice of upholstery fabric which reflects the type of material that was available and was used mid-century to cover sofas and chairs. This does not reflect the modern ideas of using much bolder and much more colourful material for soft furnishing which is why I decided to use the Belle Epoque 2 designs as sofa fabric.

Although I created the design with the intention of using the pattern at a small scale, perhaps smaller than that shown on the swatch which I posted yesterday, I have now had to have a change of heart. At a small scale this pattern looks bitty and quite out of place as a sofa fabric pattern. But at a larger scale the sofa becomes alive and it begins to look larger and much more comfortable than it did before.

To be honest, I am not completely sure that I like a fabric this light on a sofa and I do not think that I would be the first to rush out and buy one. However this is the sort of look that I see in interior magazines that I view each month so maybe it is right. Maybe you will like this, maybe you are more modern than am I.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff533 As Cushion Material

As I said when I introduced this design, the pattern is based on my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 and I saw this as either curtain fabric or alternatively as a covering for cushions. Having tried both, I realised that the smaller scale of Belle Epoque 2 made the material much better to use as a cushion cover.

The overall effect and the colouring, which is based on mid-century hues, is intended to give the cushions a rich and elaborate look while at the same time making them suitable and adaptable for the modern home.

Over the last few years, modern fashion has seen the use of large-scale patterns for cushions and for other similar household soft furnishings. This is, of course, a trend which I have adopted myself in my own soft furnishing designs but since I began looking at the possibilities of Belle Epoque 2 patterns I have begun to realise that they make excellent cushions and curtains used at the proper scale.

The effect of a large design on cushions is to catch the eye and make them noticeable. It is my belief that there should, in a home, be some cushions that are like this but the majority should have a less noticeable and less eye-catching pattern. And this seems to be borne out by most modern home furnishing periodicals. For this reason I am hoping to be able to produce more Belle Epoque 2 patterns to use with soft furnishing and also to try and find a way to use them effectively as curtaining.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Wallpaper

I spent a little time this afternoon using this pattern as a three-dimensional texture to use for curtains to give a better idea of the concept that I had and how the pattern would look applied as curtaining.

I would like to say that this room was modelled on my own study but unfortunately it is part of a set representing a room in a stately home in the United Kingdom. However, I think that the pattern looks nice as curtains and that the effect when the curtains are open is a pleasant one catching the eye of a visitor and helping to maintain the high class finish of the room.

I must admit that the more I look at this pattern the more I am drawn to it and the more I think that it does fit with my developing ideas of a new Belle Epoque and I hope that you like this image.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff435 Feature Wallpaper

As I said I would, I spent a little time creating a new 3D file using this particular image as a wallcovering for a feature wall. After some thought, I decided to use the modern dining room with the nice bifold doors leading out onto the garden.

The purpose of this wallpaper is to provide a feature for the visitor as they enter the room. Obviously you cannot see the entire room but you have to imagine that the door is in the right hand wall positioned somewhere in front of the seating area. The whole scene has two sofas facing one another with an occasional table in between.

I have used a slightly bigger scale than that shown in the swatch in the last post because that seemed to suit the space better and to make the wall look more obvious and decorated. Using a smaller scale had a similar effect but here the wall looked more uniformly coloured, an idea that I was anxious to avoid. Thinking about the look of the room I was pleased with the result and, were this my living and dining area, I would be happy with the colours and the look that has been created.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Carpet From The 1960s

Two mid-century style carpet texturesI know I have said this before but I began producing patterns by making textures to wrap around 3D objects that I had created for interior views of rooms. The reason being that there were, at that time and it was a few years ago, very few textures for wallpapers, soft furnishings and other areas of a mid-century room that used patterns.

I am about to start on a room from the beginning of the 1960s (which is much more familiar territory) and in preparation I am trying to create more realistic looking carpet. The image above represents my first attempts using Filter Forge and the excellent Ruggestry filter created by DreamWarrior. The colours used are sampled from carpet designs of the 1960s decade.

I have used this filter before but this time I wanted to try combining it with the effects in Photo Paint by Corel to see if I could create a more realistic material. The results are above and, although not as good as I would like, they are much better than I have used before.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

1989 Living Room LH View

Living room in 1989 created in 3DAt last, I know it’s been a bit of a wait, the left hand view of the 1989 styled living room is available to see. There are, of course, two other views showing the centre and right hand images taken from the same camera position.

The room is a practical living space and is modelled on a living room in a detached, United Kingdom house built at around that time or a few years earlier. There is a window with a patio door to the left and to the right, as you will later see, a door out of the room.

The room has wall coverings and a carpet that reflect both the colours and patterning that would have been available to the homeowner at that time. I have tried to make the furniture also reflect that period with a three-piece suite, wall units in white chipboard, and similar matching storage. The 1980s was a time when audio came into its own with the emergence of extremely good televisions, hi-fi units and video and it really marked the beginning of the modern audio age. You will see later that this room reflects those developments.

It is also a time when lounge stools developed in sophistication from the 1960s and became popular. This is reflected in the rather nice leather stools shown.

But not everything is new, the homeowner has a mantelpiece clock, now on the storage unit, which is from a much older era, as is some of the ornamentation on the white unit.

This image is much smaller than the final image which I hope I can post in its entirety on Flickr, the link being below.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Blue Floral Squeeze

Blue floral mid-century inspired wallpaper in a tiny apartmentAt the end of July I showed this design as a swatch and said that it was a suitable design to use for a wall coverings and, at last, I have been able to produce a 3D interior design using this wallpaper.

The design owes its inspiration to various mid-century patterns that appeared in the 1960s in the United Kingdom and the colouring is mostly mid-century with the exception of the yellow which is from my expanded palette.

The set is my small apartment set that I made several years ago now and which I still use because it seems to work so well. I thought that this design might be something of a squeeze to use in this space but, happily, I was wrong and, as soon as I put the paper on the wall, I was able to see that I was on the right lines. As a colour, blue tends to make everything look cold but I think, for this small apartment, it does make it look fresh and not too tiny. Sitting back and looking at the finished image I was quite pleased with the way that it had adapted to the size of the apartment.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.