West Avenue Stairs

West Avenue is a project that I did some time back for the 1966 house but here we have the house more up-to-date and decorated in a much more modern style. I wanted to keep the walls looking plain but without using a flat and uninteresting painted surface and I therefore designed this pattern specifically for the walls of the room.

The purpose of the design is to give the walls an interesting and textured look which would work with modern ideas and modern designs but which also would create a little life and interest to the wall by creating this dimpled effect. The carpet, which is also the main feature of the room, is a pattern that I created some time back and which I felt would go well with the walls and would give the staircase and the interior a rich and inviting look. I have used the carpet pattern both on the carpet downstairs and also on the carpet on the stairs and it would, of course, run across the upper landing.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Sur La Beach en bleu

The last room was quite personal and various people suggested that perhaps I should, as I normally would, simply choose a theme for the room and redo it again. Blue is a colour that I like and which, for no particular reason, I tend not to use to any great extent so I thought I would create a blue room and see if my use of patterns found more favour.

The wallpaper and the sofa fabric are both Belle Epoque 2 patterns and, whilst the sofa fabric is designed to be very regular, the wallpaper was created with a slight jink in the pattern which takes the eye and relieves the monotony. Both the curtains and the carpet are variations of old patterns that I have done before and serve to provide pleasing decorative features to the room.

In this design the walls and carpet are light while the sofa and curtains are dark and the furniture in the room is painted white. An interesting alternative is to colour the furniture, perhaps a midnight blue to match the sofa, although this does create a rather sombre look to the room.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Sur La Beach Part 2 – The Finished Room

I thought, as I had done this with the previous room, that I would show you the finished room showcasing the wallpaper, designs for the curtain fabric and sofa, as well as the carpet.

The final result is very different from the look of the previous three images which showed plain walls and then similar, walls but where the plain surface was broken up by a surface pattern in order to provide decoration and relief from the unbroken, solid, plain surface. The decoration that I have created is very personal and reflects the way that I would like the room to be presented. The walls, curtain and window provide a sweeping mid-height surface which is light while the floor, carpet, sofa and furniture provide both light and dark areas with interesting colours and designs.

I have not shown the ceiling in this view but I would have intended that it was finished in a simple white paint although it would be quite possible to experiment with a painted ceiling.

The view outside is from an area near Nice in the South of France where the colouring is light and subtle and the days long, pleasant and warm and these have influenced the way that I have chosen to finish this room.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Ryelands Part 3 – A Final Cosier Feel

I was pleased with the previous version of the room but I wanted to make one final version where I made the room look, in my opinion, cosier and give it a more comfortable and mature look.

The final result, which you see above, is very different in feel and taste and takes us away from modern design into an area which is more homely, easier on the eye and which has a certain style and interest that used to be present in rooms but which has been lost over the last few decades.

I have replaced the panelled door by a modern flush door mainly because I never did like the way that I had modelled the panelled door which is rather my lack of expertise at modelling rather than a fault with the design. However, having done this, I immediately began to think that this was a much better surface to have as a door because it made the door less prominent and less of a feature in the room. I have also removed the rugs and removed the laminated flooring substituting a carpet. The carpet appears to be a fitted carpet but it could just as easily be a free carpet which occupies most of the area over the existing floor.

The wallpaper is a pattern that has a horizontal feature which gives dimension and size to the room as well as taking the eye across the room. The pattern on the carpet runs from the viewpoint to the far wall and again serves a similar purpose. It also, in my opinion, gives the room a cosy feel and invites the visitor or homeowner to walk on the carpet over to the sofa.

The patterns for the pouffe and the curtains are pure fun and were chosen simply because I like the look of them.

I have not created these patterns as fabric or as objects but if anyone would like to use them please send me an e-mail to miket (at) midcenturystyles.com and we will see what can be done.

These images are necessarily quite small but you can see much larger images of this, and my other designs and patterns for interiors, on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff540 As Sofa Material

I have to admit to being a little, or maybe a lot, conservative in my choice of upholstery fabric which reflects the type of material that was available and was used mid-century to cover sofas and chairs. This does not reflect the modern ideas of using much bolder and much more colourful material for soft furnishing which is why I decided to use the Belle Epoque 2 designs as sofa fabric.

Although I created the design with the intention of using the pattern at a small scale, perhaps smaller than that shown on the swatch which I posted yesterday, I have now had to have a change of heart. At a small scale this pattern looks bitty and quite out of place as a sofa fabric pattern. But at a larger scale the sofa becomes alive and it begins to look larger and much more comfortable than it did before.

To be honest, I am not completely sure that I like a fabric this light on a sofa and I do not think that I would be the first to rush out and buy one. However this is the sort of look that I see in interior magazines that I view each month so maybe it is right. Maybe you will like this, maybe you are more modern than am I.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff533 As Cushion Material

As I said when I introduced this design, the pattern is based on my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 and I saw this as either curtain fabric or alternatively as a covering for cushions. Having tried both, I realised that the smaller scale of Belle Epoque 2 made the material much better to use as a cushion cover.

The overall effect and the colouring, which is based on mid-century hues, is intended to give the cushions a rich and elaborate look while at the same time making them suitable and adaptable for the modern home.

Over the last few years, modern fashion has seen the use of large-scale patterns for cushions and for other similar household soft furnishings. This is, of course, a trend which I have adopted myself in my own soft furnishing designs but since I began looking at the possibilities of Belle Epoque 2 patterns I have begun to realise that they make excellent cushions and curtains used at the proper scale.

The effect of a large design on cushions is to catch the eye and make them noticeable. It is my belief that there should, in a home, be some cushions that are like this but the majority should have a less noticeable and less eye-catching pattern. And this seems to be borne out by most modern home furnishing periodicals. For this reason I am hoping to be able to produce more Belle Epoque 2 patterns to use with soft furnishing and also to try and find a way to use them effectively as curtaining.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff437 Wallpaper

I spent a little time this afternoon using this pattern as a three-dimensional texture to use for curtains to give a better idea of the concept that I had and how the pattern would look applied as curtaining.

I would like to say that this room was modelled on my own study but unfortunately it is part of a set representing a room in a stately home in the United Kingdom. However, I think that the pattern looks nice as curtains and that the effect when the curtains are open is a pleasant one catching the eye of a visitor and helping to maintain the high class finish of the room.

I must admit that the more I look at this pattern the more I am drawn to it and the more I think that it does fit with my developing ideas of a new Belle Epoque and I hope that you like this image.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.