Aff518 As Pattern

Don’t misunderstand me, I don’t dislike the idea of having the walls, the curtains, the carpet, the cushions and all items in the room created just in solid colours or textures. Such an idea has a natural grace and beauty in its cleanliness and emphasis on form and fine lines but what I do dislike is the idea of having no personal decoration within the living space.

In many respects I liked the mid-century clutter of patterns and designs although I would not want to see a complete return to those perhaps rather chaotic days. What I would like, and the inspiration behind the Belle Epoque 2 range of patterns, is for there to be the same playful and perhaps more intense decoration applied to some of the elements found within the room.

To that end this design is even simpler and, I think, even more effective than the Belle Epoque 2 designs I have featured recently. It creates a wallpaper which gives the wall a plain, open and solid coloured look but which also hints at a sense of personal decoration which makes the wall look individual and cared about rather than a plain colour which looks clinical and painted without thought.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff518 As Wallpaper

Pattern aff518 you have already seen but this is the pattern as it might look if it were created as wallpaper for use in a modern room although, it has to be said, a modern room that looks back to the mid-century era.

I am not in favour, as you will probably know, of solid coloured walls without any decoration and yet, however, they are still fashionable for the time being. In order to create a room which bows to modern fashion, I have used the wallpaper on three of the walls (you are unable to see the third) and left the window wall painted white. I have also used white paint on the skirting board and other woodwork.

The effect I’m trying to create is one of brightness and light but where the interior has a decorated look rather than architectural and the walls, for the most part, are not boring solid colours.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff518 Pattern

Although it seems not to be the case, people and ideas really don’t change from one decade to another and what was good decoration mid-century would still be seen by people as good decoration today. The only thing that does change is fashion and fashions, as we all know, tend to come and go and then come around again.

This simple, mid-century design was intended right from the first stroke to be an easy but effective wallpaper pattern for a plain wall in an everyday modern house. But it was also intended as a design which incorporates mid-century type motifs and which uses mid-century colours.

The result is something which will not set the world alight but which will create on the wall a bright but plain effect but with the motifs there to relieve the boredom of a solid coloured wall. It will also make the space and the dimensions of the room either seen bigger or at least play to their full extent. Obviously, this design begs to be put on a wall and hopefully I will have a little time later today in order to do just that.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff517 Wallpaper

A busy, busy Belle Epoque 2 pattern as wallpaper – sounds good but does it work? Above is my rather upmarket English country house set which has been given this Belle Epoque 2 design as a wallcovering. Although it is not obvious from the set, this design would probably cover all the walls.

Although seemingly a feature wallpaper and, certainly, in a modern room such as a high-class apartment, it would be just confined to one small wall, in a setting such as this I feel that it is permissible to use it as a wallcovering on all of the walls.

The other advantage is that the colours are mid-century and they also have that strong mid-century look which I hope gives the room that classic English elegant aspect. Would I have it in my room? Yes, certainly, if I had a room like this I would.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Aff517 Pattern

I have not given up on Belle Epoque 2 patterns and this one, although having a somewhat newer origin, fits my criteria for Belle Epoque 2 as well as producing what could well be one of my nicest wallpaper designs.

The origin of this design lies back in the 1970s when the excesses of the previous decade were being curtailed and suddenly large circular patterns began to appear on walls. So far as I know, there was no one single reason for there introduction but I do remember that suddenly they seem to be everywhere.

The colours are mid-century colours taken from my extended palette and I have taken one liberty which you would not have found extensively in the 1970s. Instead of a light background I have used mid-century chocolate which gives the design is slightly more modern look. Wallpapers like this would have been available mid-century although they were not that common because the concept of feature walls was still being developed.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

Filter Forge Carpet

Something a little different to post this time. As I have said before, I got into making patterns to use as textures in 3-D scenes for architectural visualisation. One of the problems was finding suitable material for fabrics, wood and walls and, of course, carpets and other floor coverings like tiles and lino.

This carpet is created with Filter Forge and uses the excellent European Carpet filter created by Speeder to produce an excellent and realistic looking carpet. Of course, I created several different colours and no doubt I will create more for various projects. This particular colour, however, looked the best in this room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff516 Furnishing Fabric

I had intended, as I explained in the last post, to use this design as a furnishing fabric or alternatively as a fabric that might be suitable for curtains or cushions.

In this particular colour, the design is a little unsuited to curtains or cushions, but it does make, I believe, an excellent furnishing fabric. Obviously, the look of the design varies according to the furniture on which it is used but in this case I have teamed it with a sofa with wooden arms which go nicely with the dark colour.

This is not intended as a reproduction fabric or indeed as a fabric intended for a mid-century modern room but as a modern fabric. However, having said this, it would look equally good on a sofa or similar piece of furniture in a mid-century period room.

Below is a link to a product on Amazon UK for Color And Pattern, a book about pattern creation by Khristian Howell which I found so useful (and still do and still use). It is well worth a look.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.