Aff508 Wallpaper

I’m pleased to say that my whimsical pattern worked well as a wallpaper without the need to change the background and it produced just the effect that I think I was looking for.

The set is a living room set that I have used before which shows the wallpaper used on two adjoining walls with the opposite wall, the window and door wall, finished just in plain paint. The pattern is shown at a very small scale which, as I suggested in the previous post, gives the wall a granular look and, I think, an interesting look without it being too bold or too overpowering.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff508 Pattern – A Whimsy

This pattern was intended to be interesting, unusual and, yes, to an extent an amusing design but one which, nevertheless, could have a place as a wall covering on a normal wall in a normal house.

The motif is a simple one and, in line with my ideas of Belle Epoque 2, it has a small-scale and a fast repeat. The colours are taken from my extended British range of colours that would have been available mid-century. The motif, too, could well have come from that period.

The point about using this as wallpaper is that it is unusual and certainly a whimsy but it also gives a wall a full, decorated and granular look. I will try this design, perhaps with a different background, as a wallcovering when I have chance today and see how it looks. (If you never see it again then you will know that it was not one of those designs that produced a workable end product. Happily, these days, that is not something that happens too often.)

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff507 Wallpaper

The whole point of Belle Epoque 2 is to create a form of decoration to add to elements within a house such as wall coverings, fabric or soft furnishings. I am slowly being able to see more clearly the way forward and this pattern for a wallpaper I think shows where I am at this moment.

The origins of the motifs and the colouring date back to mid-century Britain and in particular to the patterns produced in the 1950s by the wealth of talent that was appearing following the end of the Second World War. The motifs are small, as is the scale, and the repeat is a fast one giving the look of overall pattern and with the lines of motif helping delineate the dimensions of the room.

You could say that this pattern gives the room a mid-century modern look but you can also say, I feel, that it also gives the room a soft and pleasant modern feel.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff507 Pattern

This was very much intended to be a Belle Epoque 2 style pattern with a relatively small-scale and a fast repeat, together with some contrast between the motif and the background.

I saw this design as being suitable for wall coverings for either a reception room or alternatively for a bedroom or, I suppose really, any other room in the house. Patterns of this nature are so good as they tend to be universally acceptable.

The motif is similar to those used mid-century and draws for its influence both on the 1950s and the 1970s in the United Kingdom. The colours are taken from my extended British range of colours that would have been in use at the time.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff506 Pattern

This is a pattern which follows closely my ideas for Belle Epoque 2 but this time is intended for the wallcovering of a modern room or alternatively to provide the decoration for a mid-century modern style room.

The idea is that the scale will be relatively small and the lighter motifs in the image will merge so that just the circles and squares will appear and so give the wall both a solid and a speckled look. The colours in the circles and squares would also allow the choice of accent colours for the room.

The colouring for the design is mustard for the background as this is both a colour which I like and also one which was extensively used mid-century. It has the advantage, too, of producing a homely and pleasant atmosphere in a room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff502 As Wallpaper

This is a very simple and straightforward pattern and so it seemed pointless producing a separate swatch when you can easily see the elements of the design.

This is, of course, mid-century influenced, taking its cue from the 1970s in the United Kingdom and using colours taken from the colours that would have been available at that time.

The room is my old wallpaper set which is probably one of the first sets that I ever created. Here, the wall covering looks pleasant and unremarkable and is intended for use on just one wall. The idea is simply to create a little interest and to provide some decoration to what would otherwise be a dull and uninspiring interior wall. This does, of course, fulfil some of my expectations for Belle Epoque 2.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff501 Paper And Fabric

Predictably, I was unable to make my mind up whether to go with the paper or with the use of fabric and so I decided to show you both and let you decide for yourself.

Actually, having said that, it is not entirely true because usually when I make patterns, I make them for a specific purpose although just lately I have been experimenting more with the final product.

I have to say that out of all of the images I prefer the look of this pattern as paper although other people have said that they like the design as curtain material. In the end, of course, it matters little since the patterns will not be made into either paper or fabric but it is an interesting exercise.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.