Aff445 Pattern As Wallpaper

I thought I would spend a little time looking at the use of this pattern as a wallcovering when used at different scales and on different types of wall.

As I suggested in the last post, this is not a design which is intended as a feature wallpaper and I thought that it would be more suitable as a wallpaper used on all of the walls in a room. Whilst I still think this, I rapidly came to the conclusion that as an ‘all over’ wallpaper it was a little too intensive. I therefore tried it as I would use it as a feature wall covering and you can see the result above.

At this scale, the pattern is quite noticeable, perhaps more noticeable than I thought it would be when it was in the design stage (this is often the case). At a smaller scale the pattern begins to look a little odd because the motifs are too close together. At a larger scale the design definitely resembles a feature wallpaper which was not quite the effect that I wanted since feature wallpapers need more impact.

However, looking at the final result, I am pleased with the way that the wallpaper looks and with the effect that it gives to the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff445 Pattern

This is a wall covering pattern that was designed from the outset just to be wallpaper and, now that it is finished, I think that this is probably going to be its final purpose since I doubt whether it would make a realistic textile.

The design, as I’m sure you will realise, is mid-century and draws on the work done in the 1950s in the United Kingdom. The shapes are simple ones but they are the type of shapes that could have been found during that period and the colours are taken from my extended British Standard range of colours that would have been in use at the time.

This type of pattern is very much the type of pattern that I had in mind when I began thinking about Belle Epoque 2 since it uses relatively small motifs with a fast repeat. The overall effect from a distance is of an undulating solid colour which I think would make this suitable for general use as a wallcovering rather than just for a feature wall.

In terms of its ability as decoration, it will obviously not set the world alight nor will it catch the visitors eye and leave them impressed on entering. It is, however, the type of decoration that looks right in a room and prevents the large areas of wall from fading into the background and from looking too artificial. That is, it makes the walls look as though they are in a room in a house which is also a home.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 Curtains

I decided to see how this 1950s pattern could best be used, the pattern is a busy one and the colour and overall look are quite strong and so the obvious choice would be fashion or soft furnishings. I have never been able to produce realistic looking fashion mockups and so I endeavoured to create a curtain fabric.

The rooms that I usually use did not seem to take the pattern particularly well but I have found a room which began life as a mid-century inspired room and the pattern used here as curtains produced a very acceptable result.

I have shown the curtains as they appear open during daylight since I think that this gives the best idea of the pattern and the colouring. At night when the curtains are pulled the pattern is stronger, and a lot bolder and this adds to the excitement within the room making the window space very much a feature.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff444 1950’s Again!

I spent some time thinking about the purpose of pattern decoration and in looking back over the three decades that are of particular interest to me and which form the core of mid-century design. My particular interest is the relatively small-scale patterns that I refer to as fast repeats. There was no better period, in my view, then the 1950s for exploiting this idea and, although I have no wish to return to that time for patterns today, I do think that paying a visit will produce some interesting and stylish designs that to many people will appear new.

The other nice thing is that they very much fall into the category of Belle Epoque 2 that I have been developing and so there will follow, hopefully, a short period of 1950s inspired patterns. I hope these will be suitable as fashion patterns and also for soft furnishings and wall coverings within the home.

To begin, this design looks very much like the 1950s in both the shapes used for the motif and the colouring. I saw it primarily as a fashion fabric and I may well put it with the styles that I intend to use with Redbubble to produce both fashion and homewares goods.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff443 1950s Pattern

One of my particular interests are the designs created in the United Kingdom in the period initially following the Second World War, that is those designs that appeared from the talented pool of artists in the 1950s.

This design is my attempt to recreate the look of the 1950s both as it was then and as it is seen today by using the sort of motifs that would have been used at that time although these motifs have a fresher and more modern feel. The colouring is taken from my British Standard palette that was in use at the time and so the colouring would not look out of place in that period.

This is not wallpaper, although the patterns were used extensively for wall covering, rather it is a textile design which I saw being used for the smaller soft furnishings around the home such as cushions and towels.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff442 Curtains

As I indicated, this pattern was created with the intention of making a textile file which I would then use as a texture. I therefore decided to try the design as curtain material.

The image above shows the design as it would look as curtain fabric in, for example, a hotel or a large upmarket apartment. The background is mid-century nightshade and this is a difficult colour to match and to work with and I therefore decided to make the surrounding colours nondescript and this seems to have worked well.

As you can see from the swatch in the previous post, the motif is small and I have deliberately kept the scale reasonably tiny and this gives a busy and interesting look to the curtains and helps to show off the height of the room. The small-scale also helps to make the pattern unobtrusive where otherwise it would catch the visitors eye and create a look that was too domineering for the room.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.

Aff442 The Treat Pattern

I like small motifs with a fast repeat but just lately I seem to have drifted a little way away from that and so this design today takes me back to the patterns that I was creating when I began making designs some eight years ago.

Most of my initial designs were for wallcoverings or for curtains or other soft furnishings and were designed to act as textures in 3D interior models. I have always, or at least nearly always, created a pattern with, in my mind, an end use which is normally either paper or textile. In this case I saw the pattern as a textile one.

The motif is a general one and is comprised of several stock shapes that I have in my library while the colouring is very mid-century using the lovely nightshade for a background.

If you wish, you can also see larger versions of this and, of course, my other designs and patterns for interiors on my Flickr page, a link to which is here.