Small Repeat – Big Wall

Mid-century inspired pattern

Small Repeat – Big Wall

Mid-century inspired pattern

Small Repeat – Big Wall Swatch

All right, so I’m cheating. I particularly like one pattern that I used sometime back – Ai343 – and over the weekend I was working on this pattern to make it look more orderly when I realised that it would look good as a very small scale pattern.

With a complete redesign and a small scale it now gives much more of an impression of horizontal movement which I think helps to give dimensional and scale to the size of this room (which is already quite large). It also, and this was the main point of my experiment, gives the wall a textured look which, to be honest, is far more the look I wanted than I have been able to get in previous work.

There is, of course, the added bonus that when you look closer you see the balance of the pattern and the way that the elements and groups of elements are being used. On my Flickr page I have shown a close-up to help show this. I am hoping that wallpaper like this, designed as a texture, is something which will catch on in the future.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Fishy

Mid-century inspired pattern

Fishy

Mid-century inspired pattern

Fishy

This pattern is, well, a little bit of fun and arose out of time spent simply playing with Adobe Illustrator which is the way, of course, a lot of patterns and designs suddenly materialise.

It was not designed as fish and, to be honest, it was not until I had the design well underway that I realised that it could be fish navigating their way between little round yellow things that you would probably never find in the sea.

The end result was a pattern that you would, perhaps naturally, use at a very small scale but my attempts to do this were not very successful. What I believe was much more successful was to use the pattern at quite a large-scale on a big wall and create a very eye-catching and statement type design. I therefore used it on this very modern and very nice apartment block overlooking the warm ocean.

The wallpaper certainly catches the eye of a visitor and, to be honest, I had second thoughts about the pictures on the wall although without them the effect was too overpowering. The wall really needs something different although I was unable to find anything suitable. That aside, I have to admit to being pleased with the result and I think that, where this my apartment, I would be quite impressed even though my own tastes are less modern and more antique.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Interconnected fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Interconnected fabric

Mid-century inspired pattern

Interconnected fabric

This particular pattern is both modern and mid-century inspired since it uses mid-century colours as well as the sort of design that might well have been a popular choice at the beginning of the 1950s in the UK.

The design has a strong sense of pattern and uses squares although this shape is deliberately broken by the dark square. However, the yellow and white dots march horizontally and vertically to give form and emphasise dimension. I tried several colour combinations before finally settling on the one you see which was intended to be both cool and restful and to convey, if it is possible in this world, a sense of tranquillity.

Although I was pleased with the look of this pattern as curtaining, I also thought that the pattern made an excellent cushion cover.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Flowery Curtains

Mid-century inspired pattern

Flowery Curtains

Flowers are flowers are flowers and those who know me will know that I am not very keen on flowery patterns but, every now and again, I do produce one.

This was designed from the outset as a curtaining material and intended to be used at quite a large scale where the shapes and colours blend more together. It is shown here as simple curtains at a window where its use would probably be in older style residence or for people who appreciate more traditional values.

I am a townie, I have lived in large cities all my life where this fabric is probably the sort of design that would be appreciated by those who live and enjoy the out-of-town life.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Train Seats

Following on from yesterday’s post about bus seats, we have a pattern which has some similarities and which is designed for similar modes of transport. In this particular case, however, it is shown as the pattern on the seats in a train.

Once again the pattern is shown at a fairly small-scale although in this particular case it does not have a strong horizontal element, the pattern being more or less equally divided. This, I think, lends itself well to double seating and I rather like the look of it in seats which face.

Once again the pattern is a colourful one with small shapes designed to enliven and amuse the traveller and so this is, of course, intended primarily for use where the journey time will be relatively short. In my opinion, longer journeys of an hour or greater should really use seats which are more relaxing. I will show suitable ‘long-range’ patterns at a later date.

The train was modelled in Cinema 4D with all of the modelling produced by me and I have, of course, produced all of the textures used.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Bus Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bus Seats

Mid-century inspired pattern

Bus Seats

Most of us use public transport, and many do so several times a day, and yet how often do we look to appreciate the pattern on our seats?

Designing seats for transportation has been an interest of mine for some time and recently, having taken inspiration from mid-century designs, I have decided to create some more patterns suitable for transportation.

As a vehicle (pun intended) for these designs I have created the interior of the bus with a row of seats stretching lengthways since these show patterns at their best. This first design is based on mid-century colouring and it uses the type of motifs that might have been available in the early 1950s when patterns were just beginning their renaissance after the Second World War.

The pattern is used at quite a small scale and has a strong horizontal component which takes the eye along the length of the seats while the red motif adds a splash of colour and daring to the design. The seats are on a transportation device which is intended to be used for short journeys and so the pattern is a lively and spontaneous design to help the traveller stay energised and enjoy the short journey.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Curtains And Cushions

Mid-century inspired pattern

Curtains And Cushions

Mid-century inspired pattern

Curtains And Cushions

This has, to be honest, quite a conservative and rather traditional look for a fabric designed to be used for both curtaining and cushions although there is nothing wrong in this.

The design originally would have looked much more colourful although I decided to tone the colours down and to make the design look a little more mid-century, since this is the basis of the patterns that I produce.

The result is a design that has a foot in both areas because the colours are a little more saturated than would have occurred mid-century and the design is a little sharper for that. For the room I have used a modern design although this room has carpet rather than floorboards and more traditional longer curtains which I think gives it something of a mid-century look.

The effect is, quite simply, a homely look rather than a sparse minimalist type of room. I saw this is a room very much for relaxing and enjoying, perhaps, the pursuit of hobbies.

You can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.