1950’s Pattern For Cushions

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One thing that I really like doing is making patterns from the early part of the mid-century era, that is from the 1950s.

Following the Second World War there was an explosion of talent from designers and in the euphoria and hope of the early 1950s much experimental work was done. This pattern is similar to one of the types of pattern that was produced at that time and is shown here in a rather simpler form to be used as a covering for cushions. I have used a simple form of the pattern in order to make this more acceptable to modern tastes and to produce a retro look which will sit well on a modern sofa in a modern room.

However I have not done this with the colour and the three colours used, bottle green, Pacific blue and poppy red, are all colours from the British Standard colours in use at the time. Although these colours are perhaps a little bold, I believe that they reflect modern tastes and will be perfect to use to create accent colours.

I have used Redbubble cushions and if you would like to see this design used as cushions then you can do so by clicking here. Also, you can see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Blue And Green Wallpaper

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Blue And Green Wallpaper

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Blue And Green Wallpaper Swatch

The trend recently has been to have quite large motifs with wallpaper which have the effect of making the pattern very noticeable.

Here I have done the opposite which is to use the design at a relatively small-scale – although much more than might have been used mid-century. The effect is to give an area of colour punctuated with coloured designs most of which are complimentary with the exception of the blue which is there to give structure to the pattern.

I have used the large room that I originally built to show off large designs but here it looks just as good. The blue designs in the wallpaper lead the eye horizontally along the room and thus show the size of the wall as well as drawing the eye across the furniture.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Triangular Midcentury

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Triangular Midcentury

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Triangular Mid-century Swatch

Triangles are a very old shape having been used to produce patterns since people first began the process of decoration.

Although mid-century cannot claim to be the first to use this pattern, nor can it claim to be the first to use this pattern extensively, it is certainly true that mid-century designers enjoyed using the triangle and also knew what a pleasant and useful shape it was.

This pattern, which will probably one day become a wallpaper, uses triangles in a very 1950s way by ‘hanging’ them vertically. This produces a pattern which shows the dimensions of the wall and also tends to take the eye to anything embodied in the wall, in this case a window with a nice view of a garden outside.

The colours used are taken from the British Standard palette in use at the time and these give the wallpaper a very mid-century look. The wall containing the doors out onto the patio has been painted in a simple mimosa colour while I have kept the floor covering that I have always used with this set. The result is a bright room that takes and responds well to sunlight having a warm, peaceful ambience.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Corton Nightshade

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Corton Nightshade

Surface patterns designed for fabric lend themselves well to their use as curtaining since this allows for a large area and so provides a good look at the design.

Here I have used lovely Corton Nightshade as the curtaining fabric in the West Avenue set but with one important difference. This time I have drawn the curtains to give a much bigger canvas for the design to show through. In order not to substantially change the colour or the look of the room I have not used a tungsten bulb in the lights so you have to imagine that the lighting uses natural daylight lights – the sort of light that I use at home.

Nightshade is a lovely colour (although not a particularly nice plant) and here I have teamed it with a very, very light apricot and a slightly silver coloured wallpaper and I think this this shows up the curtains well.

Corton nightshade is one of my designs that I have made available from Spoonflower as a fabric and also as a wallpaper. You can see the page on Spoonflower here.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Making A Statement With Curtains

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Making A Statement With Curtains

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Making A Statement With Curtains Swatch

Midcentury motifs and designs so often lend themselves to quite eye-catching patterns that can be very useful for statement making.

Here I have used a very simple motif which is influenced by the fabulous designs of the early 1950s at quite a large-scale on fabric used for curtaining. The room used is my set of a very normal living or dining room in a modern house or apartment and the effect of this is quite eye-catching and at first glance stunning.

I have used a darker coffee colour for the walls and, of course, kept them plain in order to show how this would look in a modern setting.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

New Apartment

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Claydon red wallpaper

mid-century inspired surface pattern

New Apartment

I did say that I was going to create some new sets to showcase my range of home furnishings and wallpaper and so here is another luxury apartment penthouse.

The design is based on most modern apartments that you can see if any large city and, to be quite honest, there is nothing special or innovative about it. The harbour over which it is set, I feel, creates just the right atmosphere and I have done my best to make the lighting reflect this.

In this first image I have used a feature wallpaper Claydon red which I think sets off the apartment really well and helps to show the dimensions. The other image is a more generally image showing the layout that I have used and giving a view as if you were sitting down opposite the main sofa.

The useful and quirky Claydon range of wallpapers are available in gold, green and red from Spoonflower at the link shown here.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Brown And Mid-Century

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Brown And Mid-Century

mid-century inspired surface pattern

Brown And Mid-Century Swatch

One colour that seems to crop up a lot during the mid-century years, at least in the United Kingdom, is brown and I suppose it is possible to say that that colour seems to sum up the decade.

Since I compose patterns from this period it is obvious that I use a lot of browns and similar shades in the patterns that I make.

Lately I have been making patterns that are intended to be seen at quite a large scale but this pattern is an exception and I deliberately made it to be used at a fairly small scale as a wallpaper on a large feature wall. I have to admit to being extremely pleased with the result, the pattern looks quite intense on the wall and the small motifs, they represent flowers, sit quite nicely. I actually did intend this to be at a slightly smaller scale although the results were not so good.

I used my usual mid-century room and with it I have used yellow on the adjoining wall and this colour is also used in the curtains. The cushions on the sofa use a different pattern, one which I have recently made and which you will probably see more of shortly.

One thing that this wall needs, and the one thing that I think is important with small scale patterns, is some decoration to break up the large surface of the wall. If this were a real room then I think that I would probably use some quite large pictures to create a focal point since this wallpaper is very much background wallpaper rather than lifestyle feature wallpaper.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.