Red Pins Mid-century Inspired Fabric

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Pins As Fabric

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Pins Fabric Used As Cushions And Curtains

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Pins Swatch Rotated 90 Degrees

There are some designs that appeared mid-century and which seem to have been almost lost in the passage of time between then and now.

This pattern is based on midcentury ideas that appeared around the 1950s and which I always was attracted to and which I have used several times as the basis for modern day designs. The background is lovely poppy red while the ‘pins’ are mustard and court grey – the ‘shafts’ being daybreak and chocolate. These are all colours from the British Standard which was one of the palettes used in the UK at that time.

Some of the mustard pins are double-headed to from a cross with a long almost horizontal pin below in order to give some structure and a way to the pattern whether this way or at 90 degrees. To help see this I have included a ‘sideways’ swatch.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Mid-Century Square Pattern Fabric

mid-century inspired fabric design

Mid-Century Square Pattern Fabric Cushions

mid-century inspired fabric design

Mid-Century Square Pattern Fabric Curtains

Ai342_03_mosaic

Mid-Century Square Pattern Fabric Swatch

Squares, oblongs, circles and similar basic shapes have been a mainstay of pattern design and this trend, as today, was reflected mid-century.

The design here is based on squares rotated 45 degrees with a contrast false stitch edging to create the pattern and give them some interest. Although not a technique developed midcentury it was used in that period and before and is probably in use today. The effect is a pleasant one of making the eye see all the pattern almost at once and this gives an overall view which makes the fabric ideal for cushions and curtains.

There are, in fact, two colour variations shown here. The difference between them is not great but it is enough to give the patterns a noticeable difference and make them individual.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Swiss Cheese Pattern

mid-century inspired fabric design

Swiss Cheese Pattern – The Room

mid-century inspired fabric design

Swiss Cheese Pattern Swatch

I have always like wallpaper designs that appeared to have some texture to them even though they are in fact flat 2D.

This design, it’s a sort of Swiss Cheese pattern, has a 3D look which, as a wall covering in the modern apartment, gives it a very handsome and industrial appearance.

The basis for the design is mid-century and the colours for the most part are mid-century, too. I have used jasmine (a British Standard midcentury colour) for the left hand wall which gives more depth to the room. Overall the effect is quite hard and masculine and would need softening perhaps with soft furnishings but it does look good and very eye-catching.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Cosy Bedroom Wallpaper

mid-century inspired wallpaper design

Cosy Bedroom Wallpaper Pattern

midcentury inspired wallpaper design

Cosy Bedroom Wallpaper Swatch

A proportion of mid-century designs were very much experimental to see how far and to an extent how fast the bounds could be pushed but that was not universally the case.

Many of the designs were targeted at the bulk of the population who wanted neat and cosy – just the way their parents did and the way that most people do today. For them a whole host of designs were produced, most of which never made the headlines but which did find their way into the homes of midcentury decorators.

This design falls into that ‘cosy’ category and is shown above as a bedroom wallpaper although it might equally have been used in most other rooms of the house.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Dotty Cushions

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Dotty Cushions

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Dotty Cushion Swatch

I have always had a special liking for midcentury polka dots as a pattern particularly on fabric and especially when used on cushions.

Dotty patterns have existed in most decades, including the present and mid-century was no exception where they were used particularly as a fashion fabric. This pattern is quite busy with lots of colour and I thought I might have overdone it and have difficulty finding suitable backgrounds but after some experimentation I chose lovely Baltic blue, chestnut and finally jonquil. You can see all the colours in the image above while the swatch uses just jonquil.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Stylish Midcentury Inspired Fabric

05_1000

Stylish Midcentury Inspired Fabric

midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Stylish Midcentury Inspired Fabric Swatch

Squares have always been an integral part of fabric and wallpaper patterns and this was never more so than in mid-century United Kingdom.

This design is inspired very much from the patterns that were created early in the mid-century period – say from late 1950s into the next decade. This was never ground breaking stuff but these sort of patterns were the bread and butter for curtains and cushions and I have created both of those here. Once again, this type of design is long overdue a revival, or so I think.

The patterns are not eye-catching, they do not immediately grab attention, but they do hold the eye while people make sense of the motifs and see how they match and style the curtains and cushions.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.

Back In The 1950s

1950s and midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Back In The 1950s Cushions

1950s and midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Back In The 1950s Curtains

1950s and midcentury inspired fabric pattern

Back In The 1950s Swatch

The 1950s was a great time of experimentation and of the transferring and infusion of ideas from one branch of art to another.

Here we have what would hopefully pass without a second glance as a 1950s pattern and one that would have appeared in rooms throughout the UK. I have used this pattern before as a sticky plastic on tables but it deserves much more than this and so I have at last been able to use it as a fabric design in its own right for both curtains and cushions.

The background colour is mid-century brass from the British Standard of the time while the other colours used are contemporary hues, too. I did try this with various other backgrounds but nothing else seemed to have the same impact or to look as nice.

As both cushions and curtaining, the pattern creates interest and is certainly eye-catching although it is far from being obtrusive and I think it would make a good fabric for today. I believe, and I have said this many times, that the 1950s in particular is about due for a revival of interest.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and my other work on my Flickr page which is here.