Square Mid-Century Wallpaper

Squares have been an integral part of patterns probably as long as there have been patterns and they were used to great effect mid-century.

This pattern is formed by a repeated collection of squares which help to draw the eye along the dimensions of the room and so make it seem fuller. The pattern is similar to those that were used in the 1950s and 1960s in the UK and the colours are chosen to mimic those in use mid-century.

The blues give the 1970s room a cooler and more aloof feeling than my usual browns and the room seems cleaner and more airy as a result.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

Mid-Century Furnishing Fabric

The pattern shown above is a normal, everyday example of the type of furnishing fabric that you might have found in a home mid-century.

The pattern itself is a simple geometric using diamond shapes and the colour used is a mid-century hue from the British Standard. This was a colour scheme in use in the UK at the time.

The set – no surprises here – is my furnishing fabric set which uses mid-century style furniture which was made in Cinema 4D. The pattern itself was created using Xara Designer.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

1970s Style Curtains

Curtains that are without patterns – and you seem to see so many today – always look so very unfinished and lacking to me.

Mid-century in the UK the position was quite different with a rich mixture and variety of curtain styles and patterns from which to choose. A lot of this came from the legacy of designs available from pre-war years when florals and small scale were champions. However, a lot of this, too, was the amazing mid-century innovation from many talented designers which would lead eventually to the richness and choice of the 1970s.

This pattern is an easy one that is used at a small scale to produce a very 1970s or late 1960s look to a UK living room. The pattern was constructed using Xara Designer while the room is my usual mid-century living room produced in Cinema 4D.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

Mid-Century Style Lounge Wallpaper

A lot of styles were tried mid-century although the vast majority of people, I believe, must have opted for tried and tested decorating schemes both in colour and design.

This is a nice motif on a solid background which uses the sort of colours used mid-century in the UK. The effect is more of a solid colour than most of our designs and it show up the size and dimensions of the 1970s room well, I feel. I chose to use the design on just one wall and use a colour on the wall by the window but most probably decorators in the 1970s would have used the paper on all walls.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A 1970s Bedroom Wallpaper

I suppose bedroom wallpapers traditionally are small patterned, pastel papers but even this trend began to disappear in mid-century England.

To fit in with this design ethic, the design here is shown at a fairly large scale in the room. However, I have made sure that the colours and shapes are suitable for bedroom use although I am not sure if that would have been the case mid-century.

The room is my normal mid-century bedroom made some time back in Cinema 4D and the design was created using Xara Designer.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A 1970s Living Room Wallpaper

The trend these days is to use patterns on a small scale, if a pattern is used at all, but mid-century walls used patterns in a quite different way.

The design is a simple one that might have appeared in the late 1960s or perhaps the early 1970s in the UK. These motifs grew out of the psychedelic excesses of the mid-60s and might have been perhaps toned down versions of motifs used then.

But the main feature was that they were used at a quite big scale and designed to have an immediate impact on the visitor. They said quite loudly and unmistakeably that here was a modern 70s person.

In this mid-century room they look very pleasant and very much the way that a room at that time would have looked. Today the large pattern is too obvious but at the time this room would have looked pleasantly average.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.

A Mid-Century Kitchen Table Texture

This type of pattern and certainly this colour appeared in the UK in the 1950s and was used for fabric, walls and, in particular, for adhesive plastic sheet.

This material, which a well-known UK children’s program called ‘sticky-back plastic’, was durable, of good finish and easy to keep clean making it ideal for use in the kitchen, bathroom or similar areas. Here it is used to cover the top of the table and the chairs in a dining kitchen making the room look bright and cheerful.

As ever, you can also see larger versions of this and our other work on our Flickr page which is here.