Furnishing fabric Ai253

2 furnishing patterns

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Furnishing fabrics are an important part of designing and producing patterns and yet they tend to be overlooked as being unglamorous and perhaps not so easy to create.

I have to be honest and say that creating patterns with a small repeat and which are, within themselves, compact and quite geometric are a pleasure for me and so furnishing fabric patterns are something that I enjoy making.

The pattern shown in these two images is exactly the same pattern, believe it or not, and if you look closely you will see that this is true. The difference, of course, is in the colouring and the contrast between the colours. The red pattern is intended to be more noticeable, to have more contrast and to catch the eye, directing the viewer to the furniture in question. Such a pattern would, for example, be ideal for indicating the position of furnishings on which to sit or simply to highlight a particularly nice sofa or chair.

The green pattern, however, is not so readily noticed and, as I hope you can see from the illustration, blends into the forms and colours of the room. Such a fabric creates a relaxed and peaceful atmosphere and so works well in rooms designed for ease and comfortable living. It is also the sort of pattern that works well in a commercial setting where simple colour and design for a seating unit is all that is required.

Again, I have to be honest, I enjoyed creating both these two patterns and the images that you see above which I think reflect the intention behind the patterns and hint at their possible use.

Although not designed as representative of a particular period, these patterns could well be mid-century or possibly have been created up to the present day. I have added these patterns to my rapidly growing stock of interior design textures and so I expect that I will have occasion to use them in a, possibly mid-century, room shortly.

A full size image is on my Flickr page which is here.

About Mike
I design and create 3D interiors and mid-century inspired surface patterns

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