Furnishing Fabrics AA series

Modern furnishing fabric patterns Modern furnishing fabric patterns

These are the first two furnishing fabrics of four created with Filter Forge and shown as a composite recently on this blog.

Here the design is shown in two colours and at two different scales on the sofa and chair of my furnishing set showing its versatility and scope. Although simple, surface patterns made this way with Filter Forge filters can have an unexpected richness of both colour and shape that it is hard to create any other way.

Furnishing Fabrics

Furnishing Fabrics

The image shows a composite of four furnishing patterns created with Filter Forge using the Fabrictiles filter created by Lily.

These are modern furnishing fabric patterns and I will use these designs as textures on modern furnishings in a 3D interior design.

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A perennial furniture pattern that has midcentury roots

A perennial furniture pattern that has midcentury roots

Some patterns seem to have been around forever simply because (like me) they are good at their job, look nice and work well.

This design, and others like it, have existed for a long time and, although simple, they provide very good coverage for furnishings. They are not eye-catching, not a fabric design that is noticed yet they give a pleasant and soft look to furnishings which makes them idea for everything from domestic to large scale commercial use.

This pattern looks clean and comfortable on the sofa and chair and I believe that it looks an inviting fabric that tempts the viewer to sit and rest. Once there, it also not an intrusive design and so will allow the user to stay rested for as long as is desired.

The colours are mid-century and the background is the lovely BS7077 Shadow Grey which I have made into a texture using Filter Forge software.

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A dark feature wallpaper surfacepattern

A dark feature wallpaper surfacepattern

There is no law that says that old fabric designs should be confined to special ‘retro’ rooms, a person is free to choose the fabric they like for the room they want.

This design uses many ideas from the 1950s and was designed to be a feature wallpaper and is shown here in a 1960s style bedroom although it could just as easily have been used in a modern room. It is a simple design intended to look easy-on-the-eye while at the same time being interesting enough to catch attention.

The adjoining wall is plain, I did try it on all walls but that was not as successful. As with most of my designs, the colours used owe allegiance to the British Standard palette in use in the middle of the century.

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An unremarkable 1950s style curtain fabric pattern

An unremarkable 1950s style curtain fabric pattern

After the dull, drab and horrifying years of the Second World War, the 1950s began with hope and a sense of brightness that was reflected in most, although not all, of the designs that appeared.

Of course, it is the richer, perhaps more sensational and avant guard designs that we tend to see as representative of the decade. However, as well as this, surface patterns were also being produced that were designed to blend in with the furnishing of the time rather than make a bold statement. There was nothing new in this, it was something that had always been the case. For the vast majority of customers of any decade the product that they want is the ordinary, run-of-the-mill designs that will not attract attention yet will look nice and harmonise with the rest of their d├ęcor.

This designs uses motifs popular in the period and low-key colours to produce a fabric pattern that I have shown in curtaining in the Ferris room. This is definitely not 1970s (the decade that produced the room) but spaces like this would have been found in the new housing erected in the 1950s. The purpose of this pattern is simply to look nice and to reflect the values and tastes of the owner. It is bread and butter rather than jam, nicety rather than striking but, once done, it is exactly the way that many rooms looked in this period.

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A 1960s furniture pattern

A 1960s furniture pattern

‘For domestic furniture, as opposed to public service transport fabrics, the style should be bolder, the patterns more stylized and the colors more saturated.’

And so this is, I intended it for the sofa and chair that I use as one of my furnishing sets in Cinema 4D. OK, the color (it’s authentic 1960s) is a bit ordinary but the pattern is a cheeky one that shows up as squares to frame and pick out the furniture presenting it ready to sit on.

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A 1950s style curtain pattern

A 1950s style curtain pattern

Once again we are firmly back in the early years of the 1950s for this pattern which I have configured as a curtain material although there are many similar furnishing tasks which it could adequately perform.

These designs came to patterns from the modern art movement which has always been at the back of pattern design exerting its powerful influence. The idea was to use small elements with curved forms rather than straight edges and to embed these in a modern background. The background chosen here is a fabric type material made with Filter Forge and the colour used is BS3039 Chocolate, one of the most used British Standard colours. The fabric style background has been stretched to provide some texture for the render which adds to the Irwan texture filter in Cinema 4D.

There are a host of excellent patterns that appeared in the early (and exciting and inventive) years of the 1950s and which, so far as I know, have yet to be repeated although a revival, I believe, is long overdue.